Student reflections on learning cross-cultural skills through a 'cultural competence' OSCE

Elizabeth Miller, Alexander R. Green

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Medical schools use OSCEs (objective structured clinical examinations) to assess students' clinical knowledge and skills, but the use of OSCEs in the teaching and assessment of cross-cultural care has not been well described. Objectives: To examine medical students' reflections on a cultural competence OSCE station as an educational experience. Design and Setting: Students at Harvard Medical School in Boston completed a 'cultural competence' OSCE station (about a patient with uncontrolled hypertension and medication non-adherence). Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with a convenience sample of twenty-two second year medical students, which were recorded, transcribed, and analysed. Measurements and Results: Students' reflections on what they learned as the essence of the case encompassed three categories: (1) eliciting the patient's perspective on their illness; (2) examining how and why patients take their medications and inquiring about alternative therapies; and (3) exploring the range of social and cultural factors associated with medication non-adherence. Conclusions: A cultural competence OSCE station that focuses on eliciting patients' perspectives and exploring medication non-adherence can serve as a unique and valuable teaching tool. The cultural competence OSCE station may be one pedagogic method for incorporating cross-cultural care into medical school curricula.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalMedical Teacher
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2007

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Cultural Competency
Medication Adherence
Medical Schools
Learning
Students
examination
Medical Students
medication
learning
Teaching
student
Clinical Competence
Complementary Therapies
medical student
Curriculum
school
Interviews
Hypertension
hypertension
pedagogics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Education
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Student reflections on learning cross-cultural skills through a 'cultural competence' OSCE. / Miller, Elizabeth; Green, Alexander R.

In: Medical Teacher, Vol. 29, No. 4, 05.2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Miller, Elizabeth ; Green, Alexander R. / Student reflections on learning cross-cultural skills through a 'cultural competence' OSCE. In: Medical Teacher. 2007 ; Vol. 29, No. 4.
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