Structure and function of the GTP binding protein Gtr1 and its role in phosphate transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

Jens O. Lagerstedt, Ian Reeve, John C Voss, Bengt L. Persson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Pho84 high-affinity phosphate permease is the primary phosphate transporter in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae under phosphate-limiting conditions. The soluble G protein, Gtr1, has previously been suggested to be involved in the derepressible Pho84 phosphate uptake function. This idea was based on a displayed deletion phenotype of Δgtr1 similar to the Δpho84 phenotype. As of yet, the mode of interaction has not been described. The consequences of a deletion of gtr1 on in vivo Pho84 expression, trafficking and activity, and extracellular phosphatase activity were analyzed in strains synthesizing either Pho84-green fluorescent protein or Pho84-myc chimeras. The studies revealed a delayed response in Pho84-mediated phosphate uptake and extracellular phosphatase activity under phosphate-limiting conditions. EPR spectroscopic studies verified that the N-terminal G binding domain (residues 1-185) harbors the nucleotide responsive elements. In contrast, the spectra obtained for the C-terminal part (residues 186-310) displayed no evidence of conformational changes upon GTP addition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)511-517
Number of pages7
JournalBiochemistry
Volume44
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 18 2005

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GTP-Binding Proteins
Yeast
Saccharomyces cerevisiae
Phosphates
Phosphoric Monoester Hydrolases
Phosphate Transport Proteins
Phenotype
Ports and harbors
Guanosine Triphosphate
Green Fluorescent Proteins
Paramagnetic resonance
Nucleotides
Yeasts

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Structure and function of the GTP binding protein Gtr1 and its role in phosphate transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. / Lagerstedt, Jens O.; Reeve, Ian; Voss, John C; Persson, Bengt L.

In: Biochemistry, Vol. 44, No. 2, 18.01.2005, p. 511-517.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lagerstedt, Jens O. ; Reeve, Ian ; Voss, John C ; Persson, Bengt L. / Structure and function of the GTP binding protein Gtr1 and its role in phosphate transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In: Biochemistry. 2005 ; Vol. 44, No. 2. pp. 511-517.
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