Structural, material, and anatomic characteristics of the collateral ligaments of the canine cubital joint

Robert L. Vogelsang, Philip B. Vasseur, John R. Peauroi, Philip H Kass, Neil Sharkey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective - To document gross and microscopic anatomic features of the collateral ligaments of the canine cubital joint and to determine their structural and material properties. Animals - 37 canine cadavers. Procedure - After measurement of ligament dimensions, the bone-collateral ligament-bone specimens were loaded in tension until failure, using a materials testing machine. Data from the load-displacement curves were used to determine the structural and material properties of the ligaments. Gross anatomic features were studied during dissection of the specimens from the medial collateral ligament (MCL) and lateral collateral ligament (LCL), which then were saved for microscopic examination. Results - Failure load and stiffness values for the LCL were significantly (P < 0.05) greater than those for the MCL. The LCL had obvious cranial and caudal components that attached to the radius and ulna, respectively. The MCL also had cranial and caudal components; however, the cranial component was indistinct, appearing only as a slight thickening of the joint capsule. The caudal component was more prominent; as it extended distad, it had minor attachments to the interosseous and annular ligaments and attached principally on the caudolateral surface of the proximal portion of the radius. The caudal component did not have substantial attachment to the ulna in any of the specimens studied. Both ligaments were composed of closely packed, parallel fascicles of dense collagen, with scant amounts of fibrocartilage and no detectable elastin. Conclusions - Gross anatomic features of the collateral ligaments of the canine cubital joint indicate that they provide principal structural support to the joint; microscopic anatomic features are typical of other ligaments. The LCL is stronger and stiffer than the MCL; however, their material properties are similar. Clinical Relevance - Knowledge of the sites of attachment of collateral ligament components is essential for surgeons undertaking repair or reconstruction of these structures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)461-466
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Veterinary Research
Volume58
Issue number5
StatePublished - May 1997

Fingerprint

Collateral Ligaments
ligaments
joints (animal)
Canidae
Joints
Ankle Lateral Ligament
Ligaments
dogs
Ulna
Fibrocartilage
Materials Testing
Joint Capsule
Bone and Bones
Elastin
ulna
radius (bone)
Cadaver
Dissection
Collagen
bones

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Structural, material, and anatomic characteristics of the collateral ligaments of the canine cubital joint. / Vogelsang, Robert L.; Vasseur, Philip B.; Peauroi, John R.; Kass, Philip H; Sharkey, Neil.

In: American Journal of Veterinary Research, Vol. 58, No. 5, 05.1997, p. 461-466.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vogelsang, Robert L. ; Vasseur, Philip B. ; Peauroi, John R. ; Kass, Philip H ; Sharkey, Neil. / Structural, material, and anatomic characteristics of the collateral ligaments of the canine cubital joint. In: American Journal of Veterinary Research. 1997 ; Vol. 58, No. 5. pp. 461-466.
@article{bf855ce1e8604121be4de9d020afd2dd,
title = "Structural, material, and anatomic characteristics of the collateral ligaments of the canine cubital joint",
abstract = "Objective - To document gross and microscopic anatomic features of the collateral ligaments of the canine cubital joint and to determine their structural and material properties. Animals - 37 canine cadavers. Procedure - After measurement of ligament dimensions, the bone-collateral ligament-bone specimens were loaded in tension until failure, using a materials testing machine. Data from the load-displacement curves were used to determine the structural and material properties of the ligaments. Gross anatomic features were studied during dissection of the specimens from the medial collateral ligament (MCL) and lateral collateral ligament (LCL), which then were saved for microscopic examination. Results - Failure load and stiffness values for the LCL were significantly (P < 0.05) greater than those for the MCL. The LCL had obvious cranial and caudal components that attached to the radius and ulna, respectively. The MCL also had cranial and caudal components; however, the cranial component was indistinct, appearing only as a slight thickening of the joint capsule. The caudal component was more prominent; as it extended distad, it had minor attachments to the interosseous and annular ligaments and attached principally on the caudolateral surface of the proximal portion of the radius. The caudal component did not have substantial attachment to the ulna in any of the specimens studied. Both ligaments were composed of closely packed, parallel fascicles of dense collagen, with scant amounts of fibrocartilage and no detectable elastin. Conclusions - Gross anatomic features of the collateral ligaments of the canine cubital joint indicate that they provide principal structural support to the joint; microscopic anatomic features are typical of other ligaments. The LCL is stronger and stiffer than the MCL; however, their material properties are similar. Clinical Relevance - Knowledge of the sites of attachment of collateral ligament components is essential for surgeons undertaking repair or reconstruction of these structures.",
author = "Vogelsang, {Robert L.} and Vasseur, {Philip B.} and Peauroi, {John R.} and Kass, {Philip H} and Neil Sharkey",
year = "1997",
month = "5",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "58",
pages = "461--466",
journal = "American Journal of Veterinary Research",
issn = "0002-9645",
publisher = "American Veterinary Medical Association",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Structural, material, and anatomic characteristics of the collateral ligaments of the canine cubital joint

AU - Vogelsang, Robert L.

AU - Vasseur, Philip B.

AU - Peauroi, John R.

AU - Kass, Philip H

AU - Sharkey, Neil

PY - 1997/5

Y1 - 1997/5

N2 - Objective - To document gross and microscopic anatomic features of the collateral ligaments of the canine cubital joint and to determine their structural and material properties. Animals - 37 canine cadavers. Procedure - After measurement of ligament dimensions, the bone-collateral ligament-bone specimens were loaded in tension until failure, using a materials testing machine. Data from the load-displacement curves were used to determine the structural and material properties of the ligaments. Gross anatomic features were studied during dissection of the specimens from the medial collateral ligament (MCL) and lateral collateral ligament (LCL), which then were saved for microscopic examination. Results - Failure load and stiffness values for the LCL were significantly (P < 0.05) greater than those for the MCL. The LCL had obvious cranial and caudal components that attached to the radius and ulna, respectively. The MCL also had cranial and caudal components; however, the cranial component was indistinct, appearing only as a slight thickening of the joint capsule. The caudal component was more prominent; as it extended distad, it had minor attachments to the interosseous and annular ligaments and attached principally on the caudolateral surface of the proximal portion of the radius. The caudal component did not have substantial attachment to the ulna in any of the specimens studied. Both ligaments were composed of closely packed, parallel fascicles of dense collagen, with scant amounts of fibrocartilage and no detectable elastin. Conclusions - Gross anatomic features of the collateral ligaments of the canine cubital joint indicate that they provide principal structural support to the joint; microscopic anatomic features are typical of other ligaments. The LCL is stronger and stiffer than the MCL; however, their material properties are similar. Clinical Relevance - Knowledge of the sites of attachment of collateral ligament components is essential for surgeons undertaking repair or reconstruction of these structures.

AB - Objective - To document gross and microscopic anatomic features of the collateral ligaments of the canine cubital joint and to determine their structural and material properties. Animals - 37 canine cadavers. Procedure - After measurement of ligament dimensions, the bone-collateral ligament-bone specimens were loaded in tension until failure, using a materials testing machine. Data from the load-displacement curves were used to determine the structural and material properties of the ligaments. Gross anatomic features were studied during dissection of the specimens from the medial collateral ligament (MCL) and lateral collateral ligament (LCL), which then were saved for microscopic examination. Results - Failure load and stiffness values for the LCL were significantly (P < 0.05) greater than those for the MCL. The LCL had obvious cranial and caudal components that attached to the radius and ulna, respectively. The MCL also had cranial and caudal components; however, the cranial component was indistinct, appearing only as a slight thickening of the joint capsule. The caudal component was more prominent; as it extended distad, it had minor attachments to the interosseous and annular ligaments and attached principally on the caudolateral surface of the proximal portion of the radius. The caudal component did not have substantial attachment to the ulna in any of the specimens studied. Both ligaments were composed of closely packed, parallel fascicles of dense collagen, with scant amounts of fibrocartilage and no detectable elastin. Conclusions - Gross anatomic features of the collateral ligaments of the canine cubital joint indicate that they provide principal structural support to the joint; microscopic anatomic features are typical of other ligaments. The LCL is stronger and stiffer than the MCL; however, their material properties are similar. Clinical Relevance - Knowledge of the sites of attachment of collateral ligament components is essential for surgeons undertaking repair or reconstruction of these structures.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0031137982&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0031137982&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 9140551

AN - SCOPUS:0031137982

VL - 58

SP - 461

EP - 466

JO - American Journal of Veterinary Research

JF - American Journal of Veterinary Research

SN - 0002-9645

IS - 5

ER -