Stress Management and Resiliency Training for Healthcare Professionals: A Mixed-Methods, Quality-Improvement, Cohort Study

Michelle L. Dossett, Emma W. Needles, Caroline E. Nittoli, Darshan H. Mehta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of a multi-modal resilience program, the Stress Management and Resiliency Training (SMART) Program, on healthcare professional well-being and job satisfaction. METHODS: This pilot, mixed-methods, quality improvement, cohort study assessed perceived stress, physical and mental health, job satisfaction, burnout, and value of the curriculum to attendees. RESULTS: Participants experienced a significant reduction in perceived stress (P < 0.001) and significant improvements in global mental health (P = 0.001), physical health (P = 0.045), and job satisfaction (P = 0.047). There was no significant improvement in burnout. Qualitative analysis of free text responses revealed appreciation for the skills taught, increased resiliency, and a positive impact on relationships. CONCLUSIONS: Delivering the SMART Program to healthcare professionals is feasible and may serve as a useful tool for reducing stress and increasing resilience.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)64-68
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of occupational and environmental medicine
Volume63
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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