Strengthening to promote functional recovery poststroke: An evidence-based review

Sang Pak, Carolynn Patten

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

74 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Following stroke, patients/clients suffer from significant impairments. However, weakness is the predominant common denominator. Historically, strengthening or high-intensity resistance training has been excluded from neurorehabilitation programs because of the concern that high-exertion activity, including strengthening, would increase spasticity. Contemporary research studies challenge this premise. Method: This evidence-based review was conducted to determine whether high-intensity resistance training counteracts weakness without increasing spasticity in persons poststroke and whether resistance training is effective in improving functional outcome compared to traditional rehabilitation intervention programs. The studies selected were graded as to the strength of the recommendations and the levels of evidence. The treatment effects including control event rate (CER), experimental event rate (EER), absolute risk reduction (ARR), number needed to treat (NNT), relative benefit increase (RBI), absolute benefit increase (ABI), and relative risk (RR) were calculated when sufficient data were present. Results: A total of 11 studies met the criteria. The levels of evidence ranged from fair to strong (3B to 1B). Conclusions: Despite limited long-term follow-up data, there is evidence that resistance training produces increased strength, gait speed, and functional outcomes and improved quality of life without exacerbation of spasticity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)177-199
Number of pages23
JournalTopics in Stroke Rehabilitation
Volume15
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Resistance Training
Numbers Needed To Treat
Rehabilitation
Stroke
Quality of Life
Research
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Cerebrovascular accident
  • Recovery
  • Rehabilitation
  • Resistance training
  • Strength
  • Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Rehabilitation
  • Community and Home Care
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Strengthening to promote functional recovery poststroke : An evidence-based review. / Pak, Sang; Patten, Carolynn.

In: Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation, Vol. 15, No. 3, 01.05.2008, p. 177-199.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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