Strain-specific probiotic (Lactobacillus helveticus) inhibition of Campylobacter jejuni invasion of human intestinal epithelial cells

Eytan Wine, Melanie Gareau, Kathene Johnson-Henry, Philip M. Sherman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Campylobacter jejuni is the most common bacterial cause of enterocolitis in humans, leading to diarrhoea and chronic extraintestinal diseases. Although probiotics are effective in preventing other enteric infections, beneficial microorganisms have not been extensively studied with C. jejuni. The aim of this study was to delineate the ability of selected probiotic Lactobacillus strains to reduce epithelial cell invasion by C. jejuni. Human colon T84 and embryonic intestine 407 epithelial cells were pretreated with Lactobacillus strains and then infected with two prototypic C. jejuni pathogens. Lactobacillus helveticus, strain R0052 reduced C. jejuni invasion into T84 cells by 35-41%, whereas Lactobacillus rhamnosus R0011 did not reduce pathogen invasion. Lactobacillus helveticus R0052 also decreased invasion of one C. jejuni isolate (strain 11168) into intestine 407 cells by 55%. Lactobacillus helveticus R0052 adhered to both epithelial cell types, which suggest that competitive exclusion could contribute to protection by probiotics. Taken together, these findings indicate that the ability of selected probiotics to prevent C. jejuni-mediated disease pathogenesis depends on the pathogen strain, probiotic strain and the epithelial cell type selected. The data support the concept of probiotic strain selectivity, which is dependent on the setting in which it is being evaluated and tested.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)146-152
Number of pages7
JournalFEMS Microbiology Letters
Volume300
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Lactobacillus helveticus
Campylobacter jejuni
Probiotics
mannosulfan
Epithelial Cells
Lactobacillus
Intestines
Lactobacillus rhamnosus
Enterocolitis
Diarrhea
Colon
Chronic Disease

Keywords

  • Campylobacter jejuni
  • Epithelial cell invasion
  • Intestinal pathogen
  • Lactobacillus
  • Probiotics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Genetics
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Strain-specific probiotic (Lactobacillus helveticus) inhibition of Campylobacter jejuni invasion of human intestinal epithelial cells. / Wine, Eytan; Gareau, Melanie; Johnson-Henry, Kathene; Sherman, Philip M.

In: FEMS Microbiology Letters, Vol. 300, No. 1, 11.2009, p. 146-152.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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