Stereotype Relevance Moderates Category Activation: Evidence From the Indirect Category Accessibility Task (ICAT)

Steven J. Stroessner, Elizabeth L. Haines, Jeffrey Sherman, Cara J. Kantrowitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The impact of behavioral stereotypicality on category accessibility was examined using a novel method, the Indirect Category Accessibility Task (ICAT). In the ICAT, participants learn to distinguish visual stimuli from two categories based on feedback. In two studies, participants were exposed to images of individuals behaving consistently, inconsistently, or irrelevantly with traditional gender stereotypes. ICAT learning was superior in the stereotype-consistent and stereotype-inconsistent conditions compared to the stereotype-irrelevant conditions. These results demonstrate that category relevance moderates category accessibility. Implications for social categorization and stereotype change models are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)335-343
Number of pages9
JournalSocial Psychological and Personality Science
Volume1
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010

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Keywords

  • accessibility
  • behavior stereotypicality
  • categorization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Stereotype Relevance Moderates Category Activation : Evidence From the Indirect Category Accessibility Task (ICAT). / Stroessner, Steven J.; Haines, Elizabeth L.; Sherman, Jeffrey; Kantrowitz, Cara J.

In: Social Psychological and Personality Science, Vol. 1, No. 4, 01.12.2010, p. 335-343.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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