Stereological analysis of the rat and monkey amygdala

Loïc J. Chareyron, Pamela Banta Lavenex, David G Amaral, Pierre Lavenex

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The amygdala is part of a neural network that contributes to the regulation of emotional behaviors. Rodents, especially rats, are used extensively as model organisms to decipher the functions of specific amygdala nuclei, in particular in relation to fear and emotional learning. Analysis of the role of the nonhuman primate amygdala in these functions has lagged work in the rodent but provides evidence for conservation of basic functions across species. Here we provide quantitative information regarding the morphological characteristics of the main amygdala nuclei in rats and monkeys, including neuron and glial cell numbers, neuronal soma size, and individual nuclei volumes. The volumes of the lateral, basal, and accessory basal nuclei were, respectively, 32, 39, and 39 times larger in monkeys than in rats. In contrast, the central and medial nuclei were only 8 and 4 times larger in monkeys than in rats. The numbers of neurons in the lateral, basal, and accessory basal nuclei were 14, 11, and 16 times greater in monkeys than in rats, whereas the numbers of neurons in the central and medial nuclei were only 2.3 and 1.5 times greater in monkeys than in rats. Neuron density was between 2.4 and 3.7 times lower in monkeys than in rats, whereas glial density was only between 1.1 and 1.7 times lower in monkeys than in rats. We compare our data in rats and monkeys with those previously published in humans and discuss the theoretical and functional implications that derive from our quantitative structural findings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3218-3239
Number of pages22
JournalJournal of Comparative Neurology
Volume519
Issue number16
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2011

Fingerprint

Amygdala
Haplorhini
Intralaminar Thalamic Nuclei
Neurons
Neuroglia
Rodentia
Carisoprodol
Primates
Fear
Cell Count
Learning

Keywords

  • Amygdaloid complex
  • Astrocyte
  • Human
  • Neuron
  • Neuropil
  • Oligodendrocyte

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Stereological analysis of the rat and monkey amygdala. / Chareyron, Loïc J.; Banta Lavenex, Pamela; Amaral, David G; Lavenex, Pierre.

In: Journal of Comparative Neurology, Vol. 519, No. 16, 01.11.2011, p. 3218-3239.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chareyron, LJ, Banta Lavenex, P, Amaral, DG & Lavenex, P 2011, 'Stereological analysis of the rat and monkey amygdala', Journal of Comparative Neurology, vol. 519, no. 16, pp. 3218-3239. https://doi.org/10.1002/cne.22677
Chareyron, Loïc J. ; Banta Lavenex, Pamela ; Amaral, David G ; Lavenex, Pierre. / Stereological analysis of the rat and monkey amygdala. In: Journal of Comparative Neurology. 2011 ; Vol. 519, No. 16. pp. 3218-3239.
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