Stem cell therapy prior to full-mouth tooth extraction lacks substantial clinical efficacy in cats affected by chronic gingivostomatitis

Boaz Arzi, Nopmanee Taechangam, Milinda J. Lommer, Naomi J. Walker, Megan R. Loscar, Dori L. Borjesson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of this pilot study was to determine the safety, efficacy and immunomodulatory function of systemically administered adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) in cats affected by feline chronic gingivostomatitis (FCGS) prior to full-mouth tooth extractions. Methods: Five client-owned cats affected with FCGS that did not undergo full-mouth tooth extractions for FCGS treatment received two intravenous injections of 20 million fresh, allogeneic or autologous ASCs. An oral examination with photographs, a complete blood count, blood immune cell phenotyping and a biochemical profile were completed at 0 and 6 months after treatment. Results: Four cats completed the study and one cat exited the study 3 months after treatment. While the treatment was determined to be clinically safe, no positive clinical response was observed in three cats and a mild response was noted in two cats. Furthermore, none of the cats exhibited immune modulation, as evidenced by no alteration in circulating CD8+ T cells, normalization of the CD4:CD8 ratio or neutrophil counts. Conclusions and relevance: Unlike the reported efficacy of ASCs in treating cats with non-responsive FCGS after full-mouth tooth extraction, the systemic administration of ASCs prior to full-mouth tooth extraction lacks substantial clinical efficacy and is not recommended at this time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells
  • early intervention
  • efficacy
  • gingivostomatitis
  • safety

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Small Animals

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