Spontaneous rat bite fever in non-human primates: A review of two cases

C. R. Valverde, Linda J Lowenstine, C. E. Young, R. P. Tarara, Jeffrey A Roberts

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rat bite fever is a worldwide zoonotic, non-reportable disease. This entity encompasses similar, yet distinct, disease syndromes caused by Streptobacillus moniliformis or Spirillum minus. Naturally occurring rat bite fever has not been previously described in non-human primates. This report describes two cases of non-human primate rat bite fever caused by S. moniliformis; a rhesus macaque (Macaca mullata) with valvular endocarditis, and a titi monkey (Callicebus sp.) with septic arthritis. Potential sources of infection included direct contact, and ingestion of surface water or feed contaminated with rodent feces.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)345-349
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Medical Primatology
Volume31
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2002

Fingerprint

Rat-Bite Fever
Streptobacillus moniliformis
Moniliformis
Primates
fever
Pitheciidae
Streptobacillus
rats
Spirillum
endocarditis
Infectious Arthritis
feed contamination
Zoonoses
Macaca
arthritis
direct contact
Macaca mulatta
Endocarditis
Feces
Haplorhini

Keywords

  • Callicebus sp.
  • Macaca mullata
  • Monkey
  • Rat bite fever
  • Streptobacillus moniliforms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Spontaneous rat bite fever in non-human primates : A review of two cases. / Valverde, C. R.; Lowenstine, Linda J; Young, C. E.; Tarara, R. P.; Roberts, Jeffrey A.

In: Journal of Medical Primatology, Vol. 31, No. 6, 12.2002, p. 345-349.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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