Species differences in the geometry of the anterior segment differentially affect anterior chamber cell scoring systems in laboratory animals

Sara M Thomasy, J. Seth Eaton, Matthew J. Timberlake, Paul E. Miller, Steven Matsumoto, Christopher J Murphy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To determine the impact of anterior segment geometry on ocular scoring systems quantifying anterior chamber (AC) cells in humans and 7 common laboratory species. Methods: Using normative anterior segment dimensions and novel geometric formulae, ocular section volumes measured by 3 scoring systems; Standardization of Uveitis Nomenclature (SUN), Ocular Services On Demand (OSOD), and OSOD-modified SUN were calculated for each species, respectively. Calculated volumes were applied to each system's AC cell scoring scheme to determine comparative cell density (cells/mm3). Cell density values for all laboratory species were normalized to human values and conversion factors derived to create modified scoring schemes, facilitating interspecies comparison with each system, respectively. Results: Differences in anterior segment geometry resulted in marked differences in optical section volume measured. Volumes were smaller in rodents than dogs and cats, but represented a comparatively larger percentage of AC volume. AC cell density (cells/mm3) varied between species. Using the SUN and OSOD-modified SUN systems, values in the pig, dog, and cat underestimated human values; values in rodents overestimated human values. Modified normalized scoring systems presented here account for species-related anterior segment geometry and facilitate both intra- and interspecies analysis, as well as translational comparison. Conclusions: Employment of modified AC cell scoring systems that account for species-specific differences in anterior segment anatomy would harmonize findings across species and may be more predictive for determining ocular toxicological consequences in ocular drug and device development programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)28-37
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Ocular Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Volume32
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

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Laboratory Animals
Anterior Chamber
Uveitis
Terminology
Cell Count
Rodentia
Cats
Dogs
Toxicology
Anatomy
Swine
Equipment and Supplies
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Ophthalmology
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Species differences in the geometry of the anterior segment differentially affect anterior chamber cell scoring systems in laboratory animals. / Thomasy, Sara M; Eaton, J. Seth; Timberlake, Matthew J.; Miller, Paul E.; Matsumoto, Steven; Murphy, Christopher J.

In: Journal of Ocular Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Vol. 32, No. 1, 01.01.2016, p. 28-37.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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