Sorting signals within the Saccharomyces cerevisiae sporulation-specific dityrosine transporter, Dtr1p, C terminus promote Golgi-to-prospore membrane transport

Masayo Morishita, JoAnne Engebrecht

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

During sporulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the dityrosine transporter Dtr1p, which is required for formation of the outermost layer of the spore wall, is specifically expressed and transported to the prospore membrane, a novel double-lipid-bilayer membrane. Dtr1p consists of 572 amino acids with predicted N- and C-terminal cytoplasmic extensions and 12 transmembrane domains. Dtr1p missing the largest internal cytoplasmic loop was trapped in the endoplasmic reticulum in both mitotically dividing cells and cells induced to sporulate. Deletion of the carboxyl 15 amino acids, but not the N-terminal extension of Dtr1p, resulted in a protein that failed to localize to the prospore membrane and was instead observed in cytoplasmic puncta. The puncta colocalized with a cis-Golgi marker, suggesting that Dtr1p missing the last 15 amino acids was trapped in an early Golgi compartment. Deletion of the C-terminal 10 amino acids resulted in a protein that localized to the prospore membrane with a delay and accumulated in cytoplasmic puncta that partially colocalized with a trans-Golgi marker. Both full-length Dtr1p and Dtr1p missing the last 10 amino acids expressed in vegetative cells localized to the plasma membrane and vacuoles, while Dtr1p deleted for the carboxyl-terminal 15 amino acids was observed only at vacuoles, suggesting that transport to the prospore membrane is mediated by distinct signals from those that specify plasma membrane localization. Transfer-of-function experiments revealed that both the carboxyl transmembrane domain and the C-terminal tail are important for Golgi complex-to-prospore membrane transport.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1674-1684
Number of pages11
JournalEukaryotic Cell
Volume7
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2008

Fingerprint

Saccharomyces cerevisiae
Amino Acids
Membranes
Vacuoles
Cell Membrane
Lipid Bilayers
Golgi Apparatus
Spores
Endoplasmic Reticulum
dityrosine
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Sorting signals within the Saccharomyces cerevisiae sporulation-specific dityrosine transporter, Dtr1p, C terminus promote Golgi-to-prospore membrane transport. / Morishita, Masayo; Engebrecht, JoAnne.

In: Eukaryotic Cell, Vol. 7, No. 10, 10.2008, p. 1674-1684.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{7a3b4ffe30334c8b98079e5a9cf9726c,
title = "Sorting signals within the Saccharomyces cerevisiae sporulation-specific dityrosine transporter, Dtr1p, C terminus promote Golgi-to-prospore membrane transport",
abstract = "During sporulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the dityrosine transporter Dtr1p, which is required for formation of the outermost layer of the spore wall, is specifically expressed and transported to the prospore membrane, a novel double-lipid-bilayer membrane. Dtr1p consists of 572 amino acids with predicted N- and C-terminal cytoplasmic extensions and 12 transmembrane domains. Dtr1p missing the largest internal cytoplasmic loop was trapped in the endoplasmic reticulum in both mitotically dividing cells and cells induced to sporulate. Deletion of the carboxyl 15 amino acids, but not the N-terminal extension of Dtr1p, resulted in a protein that failed to localize to the prospore membrane and was instead observed in cytoplasmic puncta. The puncta colocalized with a cis-Golgi marker, suggesting that Dtr1p missing the last 15 amino acids was trapped in an early Golgi compartment. Deletion of the C-terminal 10 amino acids resulted in a protein that localized to the prospore membrane with a delay and accumulated in cytoplasmic puncta that partially colocalized with a trans-Golgi marker. Both full-length Dtr1p and Dtr1p missing the last 10 amino acids expressed in vegetative cells localized to the plasma membrane and vacuoles, while Dtr1p deleted for the carboxyl-terminal 15 amino acids was observed only at vacuoles, suggesting that transport to the prospore membrane is mediated by distinct signals from those that specify plasma membrane localization. Transfer-of-function experiments revealed that both the carboxyl transmembrane domain and the C-terminal tail are important for Golgi complex-to-prospore membrane transport.",
author = "Masayo Morishita and JoAnne Engebrecht",
year = "2008",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1128/EC.00151-08",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "7",
pages = "1674--1684",
journal = "Eukaryotic Cell",
issn = "1535-9778",
publisher = "American Society for Microbiology",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Sorting signals within the Saccharomyces cerevisiae sporulation-specific dityrosine transporter, Dtr1p, C terminus promote Golgi-to-prospore membrane transport

AU - Morishita, Masayo

AU - Engebrecht, JoAnne

PY - 2008/10

Y1 - 2008/10

N2 - During sporulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the dityrosine transporter Dtr1p, which is required for formation of the outermost layer of the spore wall, is specifically expressed and transported to the prospore membrane, a novel double-lipid-bilayer membrane. Dtr1p consists of 572 amino acids with predicted N- and C-terminal cytoplasmic extensions and 12 transmembrane domains. Dtr1p missing the largest internal cytoplasmic loop was trapped in the endoplasmic reticulum in both mitotically dividing cells and cells induced to sporulate. Deletion of the carboxyl 15 amino acids, but not the N-terminal extension of Dtr1p, resulted in a protein that failed to localize to the prospore membrane and was instead observed in cytoplasmic puncta. The puncta colocalized with a cis-Golgi marker, suggesting that Dtr1p missing the last 15 amino acids was trapped in an early Golgi compartment. Deletion of the C-terminal 10 amino acids resulted in a protein that localized to the prospore membrane with a delay and accumulated in cytoplasmic puncta that partially colocalized with a trans-Golgi marker. Both full-length Dtr1p and Dtr1p missing the last 10 amino acids expressed in vegetative cells localized to the plasma membrane and vacuoles, while Dtr1p deleted for the carboxyl-terminal 15 amino acids was observed only at vacuoles, suggesting that transport to the prospore membrane is mediated by distinct signals from those that specify plasma membrane localization. Transfer-of-function experiments revealed that both the carboxyl transmembrane domain and the C-terminal tail are important for Golgi complex-to-prospore membrane transport.

AB - During sporulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the dityrosine transporter Dtr1p, which is required for formation of the outermost layer of the spore wall, is specifically expressed and transported to the prospore membrane, a novel double-lipid-bilayer membrane. Dtr1p consists of 572 amino acids with predicted N- and C-terminal cytoplasmic extensions and 12 transmembrane domains. Dtr1p missing the largest internal cytoplasmic loop was trapped in the endoplasmic reticulum in both mitotically dividing cells and cells induced to sporulate. Deletion of the carboxyl 15 amino acids, but not the N-terminal extension of Dtr1p, resulted in a protein that failed to localize to the prospore membrane and was instead observed in cytoplasmic puncta. The puncta colocalized with a cis-Golgi marker, suggesting that Dtr1p missing the last 15 amino acids was trapped in an early Golgi compartment. Deletion of the C-terminal 10 amino acids resulted in a protein that localized to the prospore membrane with a delay and accumulated in cytoplasmic puncta that partially colocalized with a trans-Golgi marker. Both full-length Dtr1p and Dtr1p missing the last 10 amino acids expressed in vegetative cells localized to the plasma membrane and vacuoles, while Dtr1p deleted for the carboxyl-terminal 15 amino acids was observed only at vacuoles, suggesting that transport to the prospore membrane is mediated by distinct signals from those that specify plasma membrane localization. Transfer-of-function experiments revealed that both the carboxyl transmembrane domain and the C-terminal tail are important for Golgi complex-to-prospore membrane transport.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=54249119722&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=54249119722&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1128/EC.00151-08

DO - 10.1128/EC.00151-08

M3 - Article

C2 - 18676951

AN - SCOPUS:54249119722

VL - 7

SP - 1674

EP - 1684

JO - Eukaryotic Cell

JF - Eukaryotic Cell

SN - 1535-9778

IS - 10

ER -