Soft tissue sarcomas and mast cell tumours in dogs; clinical behaviour and response to surgery

M. Baker-Gabb, Geraldine B Hunt, M. P. France

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To characterise the types of canine soft tissue sarcoma and mast cell tumour treated surgically at the University Veterinary Centre, Sydney. To evaluate the success of surgical treatment of these tumours and identify variables predictive of local recurrence and survival. To establish whether conclusions drawn from previous international studies are applicable to the University Veterinary Centre, Sydney, dog population and vice versa. Design: Clinical presentation and results of surgical excision of 54 soft tissue sarcomas and 70 mast cell tumours affecting the trunk and limbs of dogs at the University Veterinary Centre, Sydney, between 1989 and 2001 were reviewed retrospectively. Results: Cross-bred dogs and Rhodesian Ridgebacks were at significantly greater risk of developing soft tissue sarcomas, and Boxers, Australian Cattle Dogs and Staffordshire Bull Terriers were at significantly greater risk of developing mast cell tumours than other breeds. Fine needle aspiration biopsy yielded a correct diagnosis in 62.5% of soft tissue sarcomas and 96% of mast cell tumours. Local recurrence was encountered after surgical excision in 7.4% of soft tissue sarcomas and 7.3% of mast cell tumours. Metastasis occurred in 6% of soft tissue sarcomas and 12% of mast cell tumours. The most significant risk factors for local recurrence were contaminated surgical margins (soft tissue sarcomas) and histological grade (mast cell tumours). Due to the low number of animals experiencing metastasis, no conclusions could be drawn about significant risk factors. Conclusions: Aggressive surgical management of soft tissue sarcomas and mast cell tumours is associated with a low incidence of local recurrence. The type, location and behaviour of mast cell tumours and soft tissue sarcomas in the population of dogs presented to the University Veterinary Centre, Sydney are similar to those reported by others.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)732-738
Number of pages7
JournalAustralian Veterinary Journal
Volume81
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

sarcoma
mast cells
Mast Cells
Sarcoma
surgery
Dogs
neoplasms
dogs
Neoplasms
Recurrence
excision
metastasis
risk factors
tissues
Bull Terrier
Neoplasm Metastasis
Boxer (dog breed)
Fine Needle Biopsy
limbs (animal)
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Soft tissue sarcomas and mast cell tumours in dogs; clinical behaviour and response to surgery. / Baker-Gabb, M.; Hunt, Geraldine B; France, M. P.

In: Australian Veterinary Journal, Vol. 81, No. 12, 2003, p. 732-738.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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