Social influences on early developing biological and behavioral systems related to risk for affective disorder

Geraldine Dawson, David R Hessl, Karin Frey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

71 Scopus citations

Abstract

Dramatic changes take place in the neural physiology and emotional behavior of the human infant during the first 2 years of life. Evidence suggests that certain variations in the infant's early social environment, such as disturbances in mother-infant interaction that are associated with maternal depression, influence the development of biological systems related to the expression and regulation of emotion, particularly those systems involved in frontal lobe, autonomic, and adrenocortical functioning. In this essay, we provide an overview of the links between maternal depression and disruptions in early social and emotional development, and we highlight parallels between disturbances in biological systems found in depressed adults and those found in infants of mothers experiencing depression. We then discuss the possibility of sensitive periods for the enduring influences of maternal depression on the emotional development of these children and for increased risk for affective disorder. Finally, we point to directions for further research on the nature of the intergenerational transmission of emotional disturbance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)759-779
Number of pages21
JournalDevelopment and Psychopathology
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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