Snare technique for the placement of a peripherally inserted central catheter in the neonatal and pediatric patient

Wayne L. Monsky, Armando S. Garza, Shaun Loh, Daniel P Link

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The placement of a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) for neonatal or pediatric patients may at times be technically challenging. We describe an alternate method of placing a PICC in neonatal and pediatric patients with difficult venous access. Methods: An Amplatz gooseneck snare is advanced from the femoral vein to the basilic vein, as a target for puncture and guidewire positioning, allowing PICC placement. Between 1999 and 2006, 44 PICCs were placed in the manner described. The medical records were reviewed allowing for up to 7 yrs of patient follow-up. Results: Ninety-five percent of PICCs were successfully placed using the snare technique. Two placements were aborted and two procedural complications occurred. The review revealed no evidence of osteomyelitis, nerve injury, deep venous thrombosis or leg length discrepancy. Conclusion: This technique offers an alternate method for PICC placement in neonatal and pediatric patients when conventional methods are unsuccessful. The technique avoids the need for intermediate to long-term jugular, subclavian or femoral vein access.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)100-105
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Vascular Access
Volume11
Issue number2
StatePublished - Apr 2010

Fingerprint

Catheters
Pediatrics
Femoral Vein
Subclavian Vein
Jugular Veins
Osteomyelitis
Punctures
Venous Thrombosis
Medical Records
Veins
Leg
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Neonatal
  • Pediatric
  • Peripherally inserted central catheter (picc)
  • Snare

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Nephrology

Cite this

Snare technique for the placement of a peripherally inserted central catheter in the neonatal and pediatric patient. / Monsky, Wayne L.; Garza, Armando S.; Loh, Shaun; Link, Daniel P.

In: Journal of Vascular Access, Vol. 11, No. 2, 04.2010, p. 100-105.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Monsky, Wayne L. ; Garza, Armando S. ; Loh, Shaun ; Link, Daniel P. / Snare technique for the placement of a peripherally inserted central catheter in the neonatal and pediatric patient. In: Journal of Vascular Access. 2010 ; Vol. 11, No. 2. pp. 100-105.
@article{418d93ee48b34567a0346dc9bf295e3d,
title = "Snare technique for the placement of a peripherally inserted central catheter in the neonatal and pediatric patient",
abstract = "Purpose: The placement of a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) for neonatal or pediatric patients may at times be technically challenging. We describe an alternate method of placing a PICC in neonatal and pediatric patients with difficult venous access. Methods: An Amplatz gooseneck snare is advanced from the femoral vein to the basilic vein, as a target for puncture and guidewire positioning, allowing PICC placement. Between 1999 and 2006, 44 PICCs were placed in the manner described. The medical records were reviewed allowing for up to 7 yrs of patient follow-up. Results: Ninety-five percent of PICCs were successfully placed using the snare technique. Two placements were aborted and two procedural complications occurred. The review revealed no evidence of osteomyelitis, nerve injury, deep venous thrombosis or leg length discrepancy. Conclusion: This technique offers an alternate method for PICC placement in neonatal and pediatric patients when conventional methods are unsuccessful. The technique avoids the need for intermediate to long-term jugular, subclavian or femoral vein access.",
keywords = "Neonatal, Pediatric, Peripherally inserted central catheter (picc), Snare",
author = "Monsky, {Wayne L.} and Garza, {Armando S.} and Shaun Loh and Link, {Daniel P}",
year = "2010",
month = "4",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "11",
pages = "100--105",
journal = "Journal of Vascular Access",
issn = "1129-7298",
publisher = "Wichtig Publishing",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Snare technique for the placement of a peripherally inserted central catheter in the neonatal and pediatric patient

AU - Monsky, Wayne L.

AU - Garza, Armando S.

AU - Loh, Shaun

AU - Link, Daniel P

PY - 2010/4

Y1 - 2010/4

N2 - Purpose: The placement of a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) for neonatal or pediatric patients may at times be technically challenging. We describe an alternate method of placing a PICC in neonatal and pediatric patients with difficult venous access. Methods: An Amplatz gooseneck snare is advanced from the femoral vein to the basilic vein, as a target for puncture and guidewire positioning, allowing PICC placement. Between 1999 and 2006, 44 PICCs were placed in the manner described. The medical records were reviewed allowing for up to 7 yrs of patient follow-up. Results: Ninety-five percent of PICCs were successfully placed using the snare technique. Two placements were aborted and two procedural complications occurred. The review revealed no evidence of osteomyelitis, nerve injury, deep venous thrombosis or leg length discrepancy. Conclusion: This technique offers an alternate method for PICC placement in neonatal and pediatric patients when conventional methods are unsuccessful. The technique avoids the need for intermediate to long-term jugular, subclavian or femoral vein access.

AB - Purpose: The placement of a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) for neonatal or pediatric patients may at times be technically challenging. We describe an alternate method of placing a PICC in neonatal and pediatric patients with difficult venous access. Methods: An Amplatz gooseneck snare is advanced from the femoral vein to the basilic vein, as a target for puncture and guidewire positioning, allowing PICC placement. Between 1999 and 2006, 44 PICCs were placed in the manner described. The medical records were reviewed allowing for up to 7 yrs of patient follow-up. Results: Ninety-five percent of PICCs were successfully placed using the snare technique. Two placements were aborted and two procedural complications occurred. The review revealed no evidence of osteomyelitis, nerve injury, deep venous thrombosis or leg length discrepancy. Conclusion: This technique offers an alternate method for PICC placement in neonatal and pediatric patients when conventional methods are unsuccessful. The technique avoids the need for intermediate to long-term jugular, subclavian or femoral vein access.

KW - Neonatal

KW - Pediatric

KW - Peripherally inserted central catheter (picc)

KW - Snare

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=78649433840&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=78649433840&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 20119910

AN - SCOPUS:78649433840

VL - 11

SP - 100

EP - 105

JO - Journal of Vascular Access

JF - Journal of Vascular Access

SN - 1129-7298

IS - 2

ER -