Smooth uncemented femoral stems do not provide torsional stability of femurs with cortical defects

J. D. Mabrey, N. Kose, X. Wang, D. Lanctot, D. Jaroszewski, K. Athanasiou, C. M. Agrawal

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) can be complicated by fracture secondary to operative penetration of the cortex or by thinning of the cortex from eccentric reaming which create stress risers in the femoral shaft and significantly weaken the bone. In the presence of such known defects in the femur, the use of a long-stemmed prosthesis is indicated. The effect of various stem lengths in bypassing cortical defects is studied. Results indicate that the introduction of a 50% defect reduces the torsional strength of test bones to only 46% as compared to intact bone. The introduction of a cemented prosthesis improved strength ratios to a range of 60% to 80% of intact bone for different bypass lengths.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationSouthern Biomedical Engineering Conference - Proceedings
Place of PublicationPiscataway, NJ, United States
PublisherIEEE
Pages57
Number of pages1
StatePublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of the 1998 17th Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference - San Antonio, TX, USA
Duration: Feb 6 1998Feb 8 1998

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1998 17th Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference
CitySan Antonio, TX, USA
Period2/6/982/8/98

Fingerprint

Bone
Defects
Reaming
Arthroplasty
Prostheses and Implants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Mabrey, J. D., Kose, N., Wang, X., Lanctot, D., Jaroszewski, D., Athanasiou, K., & Agrawal, C. M. (1998). Smooth uncemented femoral stems do not provide torsional stability of femurs with cortical defects. In Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference - Proceedings (pp. 57). Piscataway, NJ, United States: IEEE.

Smooth uncemented femoral stems do not provide torsional stability of femurs with cortical defects. / Mabrey, J. D.; Kose, N.; Wang, X.; Lanctot, D.; Jaroszewski, D.; Athanasiou, K.; Agrawal, C. M.

Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference - Proceedings. Piscataway, NJ, United States : IEEE, 1998. p. 57.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Mabrey, JD, Kose, N, Wang, X, Lanctot, D, Jaroszewski, D, Athanasiou, K & Agrawal, CM 1998, Smooth uncemented femoral stems do not provide torsional stability of femurs with cortical defects. in Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference - Proceedings. IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, United States, pp. 57, Proceedings of the 1998 17th Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference, San Antonio, TX, USA, 2/6/98.
Mabrey JD, Kose N, Wang X, Lanctot D, Jaroszewski D, Athanasiou K et al. Smooth uncemented femoral stems do not provide torsional stability of femurs with cortical defects. In Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference - Proceedings. Piscataway, NJ, United States: IEEE. 1998. p. 57
Mabrey, J. D. ; Kose, N. ; Wang, X. ; Lanctot, D. ; Jaroszewski, D. ; Athanasiou, K. ; Agrawal, C. M. / Smooth uncemented femoral stems do not provide torsional stability of femurs with cortical defects. Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference - Proceedings. Piscataway, NJ, United States : IEEE, 1998. pp. 57
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