Smoking Behaviors Among Immigrant Asian Americans. Rules for Smoke-Free Homes

Elisa Tong, Tung T. Nguyen, Eric Vittinghoff, Eliseo J. Pérez-Stable

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Higher acculturation is associated with Asian-American smoking prevalence decreasing in men and increasing in women. Asian immigrants in California are significantly more likely than their counterparts in Asia to have quit smoking. Smoke-free environments may mediate this acculturation effect because such environments are not widespread in Asia. Methods: In 2006, Asian-American current and former smokers were analyzed using the 2003 California Health Interview Survey. A multivariate logistic regression analysis examined how the interaction between having a smoke-free-home rule and immigrating to the U.S. is associated with status as a former smoker and lighter smoking. Results: For recent Asian immigrants (<10 years in the U.S.) and longer-term residents (born/≥10 years in the U.S.), having a smoke-free-home rule was associated with status as a former smoker (OR 14.19, 95% CI=4.46, 45.12; OR 3.25, 95% CI=1.79, 5.90, respectively). This association was stronger for recent immigrants (p=0.02). Having a smoke-free-home rule was associated with lighter smoking only for longer-term residents (OR 5.37, 95% CI=2.79, 10.31). Conclusions: For Asian Americans, smoke-free-home rules are associated with status as a former smoker, particularly among recent immigrants, and lighter smoking in long-term residents. Interventions encouraging Asian Americans to adopt smoke-free-home rules should be evaluated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)64-67
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume35
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2008

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Asian Americans
Smoke
Smoking
Acculturation
Health Surveys
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Interviews

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Smoking Behaviors Among Immigrant Asian Americans. Rules for Smoke-Free Homes. / Tong, Elisa; Nguyen, Tung T.; Vittinghoff, Eric; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J.

In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Vol. 35, No. 1, 07.2008, p. 64-67.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tong, Elisa ; Nguyen, Tung T. ; Vittinghoff, Eric ; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J. / Smoking Behaviors Among Immigrant Asian Americans. Rules for Smoke-Free Homes. In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 2008 ; Vol. 35, No. 1. pp. 64-67.
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