Smokeless tobacco, cardiovascular risk factors, and nicotine and cotinine levels in professional baseball players

David Siegel, N. Benowitz, V. L. Ernster, D. G. Grady, W. W. Hauck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

65 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background. The use of smokeless tobacco (ST), which has increased in popularity over the past 2 decades, results in considerable systemic exposure to nicotine. Nicotine might contribute to atherosclerosis by an effect on cardiovascular risk factors. Methods. The effects of ST use on cardiovascular risk factors and cotinine and nicotine levels were studied in 1061 professional baseball players during spring training in 1988 and 1989. Results. Of the study participants 477 (45%) were users. ST use was more common among Whites (55%) than among Blacks (29%) or Hispanics (21%), and users reported heavier consumption of alcohol (p < .001) and had higher mean serum caffeine levels (p < .001) than nonusers. ST users did not differ from nonusers in adjusted levels of systolic and diastolic blood pressure, pulse, and total or HDL-cholesterol. Among ST users, participants using snuff had higher mean serum cotinine levels than those who used chewing tobacco (p < .001). There was no association between serum cotinine levels and adjusted levels of any cardiovascular risk factor studied. However, higher diastolic blood pressures were associated with higher mean serum nicotine levels (p = .02). Conclusions. Smokeless tobacco use has at most a modest effect on cardiovascular risk factors in young physically fit men.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)417-421
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume82
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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