Slowed recovery of rod photoresponse in mice lacking the GTPase accelerating protein RGS9-1

Ching Kang Chen, Marie E Burns, Wel He, Theodorø G. Wensel, Denis A. Baylor, Melvin I. Simon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

315 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Timely deactivation of the α-subunit of the rod G-protein trans-ducin (Gαt) is essential for the temporal resolution of rod vision. Regulators of G-protein signalling (RGS) proteins accelerate hydrolysis of GTP by the α- subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins in vitro. Several retinal RGS proteins can act in vitro as GTPase accelerating proteins (GAP) for Gαt. Recent reconstitution experiments indicate that one of these, RGS9-1, may account for much of the Gαt GAP activity in rod outer segments (ROS). Here we report that ROS membranes from mice lacking RGS9-1 hydrolyse GTP more slowly than ROS membranes from control mice. The Gβ5-L protein that forms a complex with RGS9-1 (ref. 10) was absent from RGS9(-/-) retinas, although Gβ5-L messenger RNA was still present. The flash responses of RGS9(-/-) rods rose normally, but recovered much more slowly than normal. We conclude that RGS9-1, probably in a complex with Gβ5-L, is essential for acceleration of hydrolysis of GTP by Gαt and for normal recovery of the photoresponse.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)557-560
Number of pages4
JournalNature
Volume403
Issue number6769
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 3 2000
Externally publishedYes

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GTP Phosphohydrolases
Rod Cell Outer Segment
GTP-Binding Proteins
Guanosine Triphosphate
RGS Proteins
Proteins
Hydrolysis
Night Vision
L Forms
Heterotrimeric GTP-Binding Proteins
Membranes
Retina
Messenger RNA
In Vitro Techniques

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Chen, C. K., Burns, M. E., He, W., Wensel, T. G., Baylor, D. A., & Simon, M. I. (2000). Slowed recovery of rod photoresponse in mice lacking the GTPase accelerating protein RGS9-1. Nature, 403(6769), 557-560. https://doi.org/10.1038/35000601

Slowed recovery of rod photoresponse in mice lacking the GTPase accelerating protein RGS9-1. / Chen, Ching Kang; Burns, Marie E; He, Wel; Wensel, Theodorø G.; Baylor, Denis A.; Simon, Melvin I.

In: Nature, Vol. 403, No. 6769, 03.02.2000, p. 557-560.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chen, CK, Burns, ME, He, W, Wensel, TG, Baylor, DA & Simon, MI 2000, 'Slowed recovery of rod photoresponse in mice lacking the GTPase accelerating protein RGS9-1', Nature, vol. 403, no. 6769, pp. 557-560. https://doi.org/10.1038/35000601
Chen, Ching Kang ; Burns, Marie E ; He, Wel ; Wensel, Theodorø G. ; Baylor, Denis A. ; Simon, Melvin I. / Slowed recovery of rod photoresponse in mice lacking the GTPase accelerating protein RGS9-1. In: Nature. 2000 ; Vol. 403, No. 6769. pp. 557-560.
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