Sleep disturbances, quality of life, and ethnicity

The sleep heart health study

Carol M. Baldwin, Ann Margret Ervin, Mary Z. Mays, John A Robbins, Shirin Shafazand, Joyce Walsieben, Terri Weaver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

109 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study Objectives: To compare health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) across subgroups defined by sleep disturbances and ethnicity. Methods: Men (47%) and women (53%) Sleep Heart Health Study participants age 40 and older (N = 5237) underwent overnight polysomnography and completed self-report questionnaires on symptoms of sleep disturbances. The physical and mental composite scales (PCS and MCS) of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item short form survey assessed HR-QOL and were compared to sleep data. Results: Participants self-identified as Caucasian/White (n = 4482, 86%), African American/Black (n = 490, 9%), or Hispanic/Mexican American (n = 265, 5%). The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) was 17%, frequent snoring was 34%, difficulty initiating or maintaining sleep (DIMS; insomnia symptoms) was 30%, and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) was 25%. African American participants with frequent snoring, insomnia symptoms, or EDS had significantly poorer physical health compared to Caucasians (p < 0.001). Hispanics with frequent snoring, insomnia symptoms, or EDS had significantly poorer mental health than Caucasian participants (p < 0.001). Neither PCS nor MCS scores differed significantly across ethnic subgroups for participants with moderate to severe OSA (respiratory disturbance index ≥ 15, 4% desaturation). Conclusions: Across ethnic/racial subgroups, sleep disturbances are associated with worse physical and better mental HR-QOL than the U.S. norm, but this relationship may be moderated by comorbid health conditions. This study replicates and extends prior research indicating differences among minority and non-minority participants and highlights the need for future studies of sleep disturbances with larger samples of minorities that control for comorbid health conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)176-183
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Sleep Medicine
Volume6
Issue number2
StatePublished - Apr 15 2010

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Sleep
Quality of Life
Health
Snoring
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Obstructive Sleep Apnea
Hispanic Americans
African Americans
Mental Health
Polysomnography
Self Report
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Research
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Ethnicity/race
  • Health-related quality of life
  • Obstructive sleep apnea
  • Sleep heart health study
  • Sleep symptoms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Neurology

Cite this

Baldwin, C. M., Ervin, A. M., Mays, M. Z., Robbins, J. A., Shafazand, S., Walsieben, J., & Weaver, T. (2010). Sleep disturbances, quality of life, and ethnicity: The sleep heart health study. Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, 6(2), 176-183.

Sleep disturbances, quality of life, and ethnicity : The sleep heart health study. / Baldwin, Carol M.; Ervin, Ann Margret; Mays, Mary Z.; Robbins, John A; Shafazand, Shirin; Walsieben, Joyce; Weaver, Terri.

In: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, Vol. 6, No. 2, 15.04.2010, p. 176-183.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Baldwin, CM, Ervin, AM, Mays, MZ, Robbins, JA, Shafazand, S, Walsieben, J & Weaver, T 2010, 'Sleep disturbances, quality of life, and ethnicity: The sleep heart health study', Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 176-183.
Baldwin CM, Ervin AM, Mays MZ, Robbins JA, Shafazand S, Walsieben J et al. Sleep disturbances, quality of life, and ethnicity: The sleep heart health study. Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine. 2010 Apr 15;6(2):176-183.
Baldwin, Carol M. ; Ervin, Ann Margret ; Mays, Mary Z. ; Robbins, John A ; Shafazand, Shirin ; Walsieben, Joyce ; Weaver, Terri. / Sleep disturbances, quality of life, and ethnicity : The sleep heart health study. In: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine. 2010 ; Vol. 6, No. 2. pp. 176-183.
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abstract = "Study Objectives: To compare health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) across subgroups defined by sleep disturbances and ethnicity. Methods: Men (47{\%}) and women (53{\%}) Sleep Heart Health Study participants age 40 and older (N = 5237) underwent overnight polysomnography and completed self-report questionnaires on symptoms of sleep disturbances. The physical and mental composite scales (PCS and MCS) of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item short form survey assessed HR-QOL and were compared to sleep data. Results: Participants self-identified as Caucasian/White (n = 4482, 86{\%}), African American/Black (n = 490, 9{\%}), or Hispanic/Mexican American (n = 265, 5{\%}). The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) was 17{\%}, frequent snoring was 34{\%}, difficulty initiating or maintaining sleep (DIMS; insomnia symptoms) was 30{\%}, and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) was 25{\%}. African American participants with frequent snoring, insomnia symptoms, or EDS had significantly poorer physical health compared to Caucasians (p < 0.001). Hispanics with frequent snoring, insomnia symptoms, or EDS had significantly poorer mental health than Caucasian participants (p < 0.001). Neither PCS nor MCS scores differed significantly across ethnic subgroups for participants with moderate to severe OSA (respiratory disturbance index ≥ 15, 4{\%} desaturation). Conclusions: Across ethnic/racial subgroups, sleep disturbances are associated with worse physical and better mental HR-QOL than the U.S. norm, but this relationship may be moderated by comorbid health conditions. This study replicates and extends prior research indicating differences among minority and non-minority participants and highlights the need for future studies of sleep disturbances with larger samples of minorities that control for comorbid health conditions.",
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