Sleep-disordered breathing and white matter disease in the brainstem in older adults

Jingzhong Ding, F. Javier Nieto, Norman J. Beauchamp, Tamara B. Harris, John A Robbins, Jacqueline B. Hetmanski, Linda P. Fried, Susan Rediine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study Objectives: To examine whether sleep-disordered breathing is associated with white matter disease in the brainstem. Design: A population-based longitudinal study. Setting: Allegheny County, PA; Sacramento County, CA; and Washington County, MD Patients or Participants: A total of 789 individuals, aged 68 years or older, drawn from the Sleep Heart Health Study. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: The participants underwent home polysomnography in 1995-1998 and cerebral magnetic resonance imaging in both 1992-1993 and 1997-1998. The apnea-hypopnea index was not associated with white matter disease in the brainstem, with or without adjusting for age, sex, race, community, body mass index, smoking status, alcohol use, systolic blood pressure, and the use of antihypertensive medication. In contrast, the arousal index (number of arousals per hour of sleep) was inversely associated with brainstem white matter disease (odds ratio = 0.75 for a SD increase in the arousal index, 95% confidence interval: 0.62, 0.92). Conclusions: The frequency of apneas and hypopneas was not associated with brainstem white matter disease in these older adults. A unique relationship with arousal frequency suggests that ischemic changes in the brainstem may be associated with arousals during sleep.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)474-479
Number of pages6
JournalSleep
Volume27
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2004

Fingerprint

Leukoencephalopathies
Sleep Apnea Syndromes
Arousal
Brain Stem
Sleep
Apnea
Blood Pressure
Polysomnography
Antihypertensive Agents
Longitudinal Studies
Body Mass Index
Smoking
Odds Ratio
Alcohols
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Confidence Intervals
Health
Population

Keywords

  • Arousal
  • Cerebrovascular disorders
  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Polysomnography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Ding, J., Nieto, F. J., Beauchamp, N. J., Harris, T. B., Robbins, J. A., Hetmanski, J. B., ... Rediine, S. (2004). Sleep-disordered breathing and white matter disease in the brainstem in older adults. Sleep, 27(3), 474-479.

Sleep-disordered breathing and white matter disease in the brainstem in older adults. / Ding, Jingzhong; Nieto, F. Javier; Beauchamp, Norman J.; Harris, Tamara B.; Robbins, John A; Hetmanski, Jacqueline B.; Fried, Linda P.; Rediine, Susan.

In: Sleep, Vol. 27, No. 3, 2004, p. 474-479.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ding, J, Nieto, FJ, Beauchamp, NJ, Harris, TB, Robbins, JA, Hetmanski, JB, Fried, LP & Rediine, S 2004, 'Sleep-disordered breathing and white matter disease in the brainstem in older adults', Sleep, vol. 27, no. 3, pp. 474-479.
Ding J, Nieto FJ, Beauchamp NJ, Harris TB, Robbins JA, Hetmanski JB et al. Sleep-disordered breathing and white matter disease in the brainstem in older adults. Sleep. 2004;27(3):474-479.
Ding, Jingzhong ; Nieto, F. Javier ; Beauchamp, Norman J. ; Harris, Tamara B. ; Robbins, John A ; Hetmanski, Jacqueline B. ; Fried, Linda P. ; Rediine, Susan. / Sleep-disordered breathing and white matter disease in the brainstem in older adults. In: Sleep. 2004 ; Vol. 27, No. 3. pp. 474-479.
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