Single-stage bilateral tibial tuberosity advancement for treatment of bilateral canine cranial cruciate ligament deficiency

John E. Kiefer, A. Langenbach, J. Boim, S. Gordon, Denis J Marcellin-Little

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To report complications in dogs with naturally occurring cranial cruciate ligament rupture following single-stage bilateral tibial tuberosity advancement (SS-BTTA) procedures, and to compare these complications to a population of dogs undergoing unilateral tibial tuberosity advancement (UTTA). Methods: Medical records and radiographs of client-owned dogs treated with tibial tuberosity advancement between August 2008 and December 2011 were reviewed. Forty-four client-owned dogs with bilateral cranial cruciate ligament rupture that underwent SS-BTTA procedures and 82 clientowned dogs that underwent UTTA procedures were randomly selected from our hospital population. Complications were recorded and analysed. Major complications were defined as fractures or any complication requiring a second surgery. Minor complications were any problem identified that did not require surgical management. Results: Incidence for major and minor complications in the UTTA group was 2.3% and 24.4%, respectively. Incidence for major and minor complications in the SS-BTTA group was 12.5% and 26.1%, respectively. Singlestage bilateral tibial tuberosity advancement procedures had a four- to five-fold increase in odds of a major complication (p <0.050) compared to UTTA. Clinical significance: The findings of our study indicate that SS-BTTA procedures are associated with an increased risk of major complications compared to UTTA procedures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)215-219
Number of pages5
JournalVeterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology
Volume28
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

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cranial cruciate ligament
Anterior Cruciate Ligament
Canidae
dogs
Dogs
incidence
Rupture
Incidence
surgery
Population
Medical Records

Keywords

  • Bilateral
  • Cranial cruciate ligament
  • Tibial tuberosity advancement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Single-stage bilateral tibial tuberosity advancement for treatment of bilateral canine cranial cruciate ligament deficiency. / Kiefer, John E.; Langenbach, A.; Boim, J.; Gordon, S.; Marcellin-Little, Denis J.

In: Veterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Vol. 28, No. 3, 01.01.2015, p. 215-219.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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