Simultaneous occurrence of developmental venous anomalies and cavernous angiomas

G. Wilms, E. Bleus, P. Demaerel, G. Marchal, C. Plets, J. Goffin, A. L. Baert, Richard E Latchaw, C. L. Truwit, R. C. Heros

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To study the clinical and radiologic findings in 15 patients presenting with both developmental venous anomalies and cavernous angiomas and to determine which lesions caused the acute clinical symptoms. METHODS: Lesions were infratentorial in 7 patients and supratentorial in 7 other patients. In one patient the developmental venous anomaly was infratentorial and the cavernous angioma supratentorial. In all 15 patients clinical examination and CT were performed. In 10 patients MR was performed at the time of the initial CT scan. In 5 patients only late MR is available. RESULTS: Acute clinical signs were present in 9 patients (epilepsy, hemiplegia, meningeal signs, cranial nerve deficit). On CT the cavernous angioma was missed in 9 patients, in 6 patients because of acute hemorrhage. On MR the cavernous angioma was missed in 1 of 2 cases with acute hemorrhage but seen in all other patients. On repeat MR all cavernous angiomas were correctly identified. On CT, 11 developmental venous anomalies were seen. On MR all developmental venous anomalies were seen. CONCLUSIONS: The frequent association of developmental venous anomalies and cavernous angiomas is confirmed. MR is superior to CT in the detection of both cavernous angiomas and developmental venous anomalies. Furthermore our data support the hypothesis that cavernous angiomas and not the developmental venous anomalies cause the acute clinical symptoms because of hemorrhage.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1247-1257
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Neuroradiology
Volume15
Issue number7
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

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Cavernous Hemangioma
Hemorrhage
Hemiplegia
Cranial Nerves
Epilepsy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Wilms, G., Bleus, E., Demaerel, P., Marchal, G., Plets, C., Goffin, J., ... Heros, R. C. (1994). Simultaneous occurrence of developmental venous anomalies and cavernous angiomas. American Journal of Neuroradiology, 15(7), 1247-1257.

Simultaneous occurrence of developmental venous anomalies and cavernous angiomas. / Wilms, G.; Bleus, E.; Demaerel, P.; Marchal, G.; Plets, C.; Goffin, J.; Baert, A. L.; Latchaw, Richard E; Truwit, C. L.; Heros, R. C.

In: American Journal of Neuroradiology, Vol. 15, No. 7, 1994, p. 1247-1257.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wilms, G, Bleus, E, Demaerel, P, Marchal, G, Plets, C, Goffin, J, Baert, AL, Latchaw, RE, Truwit, CL & Heros, RC 1994, 'Simultaneous occurrence of developmental venous anomalies and cavernous angiomas', American Journal of Neuroradiology, vol. 15, no. 7, pp. 1247-1257.
Wilms G, Bleus E, Demaerel P, Marchal G, Plets C, Goffin J et al. Simultaneous occurrence of developmental venous anomalies and cavernous angiomas. American Journal of Neuroradiology. 1994;15(7):1247-1257.
Wilms, G. ; Bleus, E. ; Demaerel, P. ; Marchal, G. ; Plets, C. ; Goffin, J. ; Baert, A. L. ; Latchaw, Richard E ; Truwit, C. L. ; Heros, R. C. / Simultaneous occurrence of developmental venous anomalies and cavernous angiomas. In: American Journal of Neuroradiology. 1994 ; Vol. 15, No. 7. pp. 1247-1257.
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T1 - Simultaneous occurrence of developmental venous anomalies and cavernous angiomas

AU - Wilms, G.

AU - Bleus, E.

AU - Demaerel, P.

AU - Marchal, G.

AU - Plets, C.

AU - Goffin, J.

AU - Baert, A. L.

AU - Latchaw, Richard E

AU - Truwit, C. L.

AU - Heros, R. C.

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