Simplifying detection of cognitive impairment

Comparison of the Mini-Cog and Mini-Mental State examination in a multiethnic sample

Soo Borson, James M. Scanlan, Jill Watanabe, Shin-Ping Tu, Mary Lessig

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

171 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To compare detection of cognitive impairment using the Mini-Cog and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and to identify sociodemographic variables that influence detection in an ethnoculturally diverse sample. DESIGN: Cross-sectional. SETTING: A registry of the University of Washington Alzheimer's Disease Research Center Satellite. PARTICIPANTS: A heterogeneous community sample (n = 371) of predominantly ethnic minority elderly assessed using a standardized research protocol, 231 of whom met criteria for dementia or mild cognitive impairment (MCI). MEASUREMENTS: Demographic data, a standardized research protocol for cognitive assessment and dementia diagnosis, MMSE, and Mini-Cog. RESULTS: Both screens effectively detected cognitive impairment, the Mini-Cog slightly better than the MMSE (P<.01). Overall accuracy of classification was 83% for the Mini-Cog and 81% for the MMSE. The Mini-Cog was superior in recognizing patients with Alzheimer-type dementias (P = .05). Low education negatively affected detection using the MMSE (P<.001), whereas education did not affect the Mini-Cog, and low literacy minimally affected it. CONCLUSION: The Mini-Cog detects clinically significant cognitive impairment as well as or better than the MMSE in multiethnic elderly individuals, is easier to administer to non-English speakers, and is less biased by low education and literacy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)871-874
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
Volume53
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

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Education
Dementia
Alzheimer Disease
Research
Community Health Centers
Registries
Demography
Cognitive Dysfunction
Literacy

Keywords

  • Dementia screening
  • Ethnic minority
  • Mild cognitive impairment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Simplifying detection of cognitive impairment : Comparison of the Mini-Cog and Mini-Mental State examination in a multiethnic sample. / Borson, Soo; Scanlan, James M.; Watanabe, Jill; Tu, Shin-Ping; Lessig, Mary.

In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, Vol. 53, No. 5, 01.05.2005, p. 871-874.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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