Significant associations between lipoprotein(a) and corrected apolipoprotein B-100 levels in African-Americans

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14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Lipoprotein(a), Lp(a), represents an apolipoprotein (apo) B-carrying lipoprotein, yet the relationship between Lp(a) and apoB levels has not been fully explored. Methods: We addressed the relationship between Lp(a) and apoB-containing lipoprotein levels in 336 Caucasians and 224 African-Americans. Our approach takes unique molecular properties of Lp(a) as well as contribution of Lp(a) to the levels of these lipoproteins into account. Results: Levels of total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), apoB and apoB/apoA-1 did not differ across ethnicity. African-Americans had higher levels of Lp(a) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and lower triglyceride levels compared to Caucasians. Lp(a) levels were correlated with levels of TC (p<0.005), LDL-C (p<0.001), apoB (p<0.05) or apoB/apoA-1 (p<0.05) in both ethnic groups. These associations remained significant only in African-Americans after adjustments for the contribution of Lp(a)-cholesterol or Lp(a)-apoB. Furthermore, taking Lp(a)-apoB into account, allele-specific apo(a) levels were significantly associated with apoB levels and the apoB/apoA-1 ratio in African-Americans. The latter associations in African-Americans remained significant for allele-specific apo(a) levels for smaller apo(a) sizes (<26 K4 repeats), after controlling for the effects of age, sex, and BMI. Conclusions: Although TC, LDL-C, and apoB levels were comparable between African-Americans and Caucasians, the associations of these parameters with Lp(a) and allele specific apo(a) levels differed between these two ethnic groups. In African-Americans, apoB and apoB/apoA-1 remained consistently and positively associated with both Lp(a) and allele-specific apo(a) levels after adjustments for the contribution of Lp(a)-apoB. The findings suggest an interethnic difference with a closer relationship between Lp(a) and apoB among African-Americans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)223-229
Number of pages7
JournalAtherosclerosis
Volume235
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Apolipoprotein B-100
Lipoprotein(a)
Apolipoproteins B
African Americans
Apoprotein(a)
Apolipoprotein A-I
Alleles
Cholesterol
LDL Cholesterol
Lipoproteins
Ethnic Groups

Keywords

  • Apo(a) sizes
  • Corrections for the contribution of Lp(a)
  • Ethnicity
  • K4 repeats
  • Plasma lipids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

@article{6019de20af84458e842a44e1cd213f68,
title = "Significant associations between lipoprotein(a) and corrected apolipoprotein B-100 levels in African-Americans",
abstract = "Objectives: Lipoprotein(a), Lp(a), represents an apolipoprotein (apo) B-carrying lipoprotein, yet the relationship between Lp(a) and apoB levels has not been fully explored. Methods: We addressed the relationship between Lp(a) and apoB-containing lipoprotein levels in 336 Caucasians and 224 African-Americans. Our approach takes unique molecular properties of Lp(a) as well as contribution of Lp(a) to the levels of these lipoproteins into account. Results: Levels of total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), apoB and apoB/apoA-1 did not differ across ethnicity. African-Americans had higher levels of Lp(a) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and lower triglyceride levels compared to Caucasians. Lp(a) levels were correlated with levels of TC (p<0.005), LDL-C (p<0.001), apoB (p<0.05) or apoB/apoA-1 (p<0.05) in both ethnic groups. These associations remained significant only in African-Americans after adjustments for the contribution of Lp(a)-cholesterol or Lp(a)-apoB. Furthermore, taking Lp(a)-apoB into account, allele-specific apo(a) levels were significantly associated with apoB levels and the apoB/apoA-1 ratio in African-Americans. The latter associations in African-Americans remained significant for allele-specific apo(a) levels for smaller apo(a) sizes (<26 K4 repeats), after controlling for the effects of age, sex, and BMI. Conclusions: Although TC, LDL-C, and apoB levels were comparable between African-Americans and Caucasians, the associations of these parameters with Lp(a) and allele specific apo(a) levels differed between these two ethnic groups. In African-Americans, apoB and apoB/apoA-1 remained consistently and positively associated with both Lp(a) and allele-specific apo(a) levels after adjustments for the contribution of Lp(a)-apoB. The findings suggest an interethnic difference with a closer relationship between Lp(a) and apoB among African-Americans.",
keywords = "Apo(a) sizes, Corrections for the contribution of Lp(a), Ethnicity, K4 repeats, Plasma lipids",
author = "Enkhmaa Byambaa and Anuurad Erdembileg and Wei Zhang and Lars Berglund",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2014.04.035",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "235",
pages = "223--229",
journal = "Atherosclerosis",
issn = "0021-9150",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Significant associations between lipoprotein(a) and corrected apolipoprotein B-100 levels in African-Americans

AU - Byambaa, Enkhmaa

AU - Erdembileg, Anuurad

AU - Zhang, Wei

AU - Berglund, Lars

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Objectives: Lipoprotein(a), Lp(a), represents an apolipoprotein (apo) B-carrying lipoprotein, yet the relationship between Lp(a) and apoB levels has not been fully explored. Methods: We addressed the relationship between Lp(a) and apoB-containing lipoprotein levels in 336 Caucasians and 224 African-Americans. Our approach takes unique molecular properties of Lp(a) as well as contribution of Lp(a) to the levels of these lipoproteins into account. Results: Levels of total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), apoB and apoB/apoA-1 did not differ across ethnicity. African-Americans had higher levels of Lp(a) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and lower triglyceride levels compared to Caucasians. Lp(a) levels were correlated with levels of TC (p<0.005), LDL-C (p<0.001), apoB (p<0.05) or apoB/apoA-1 (p<0.05) in both ethnic groups. These associations remained significant only in African-Americans after adjustments for the contribution of Lp(a)-cholesterol or Lp(a)-apoB. Furthermore, taking Lp(a)-apoB into account, allele-specific apo(a) levels were significantly associated with apoB levels and the apoB/apoA-1 ratio in African-Americans. The latter associations in African-Americans remained significant for allele-specific apo(a) levels for smaller apo(a) sizes (<26 K4 repeats), after controlling for the effects of age, sex, and BMI. Conclusions: Although TC, LDL-C, and apoB levels were comparable between African-Americans and Caucasians, the associations of these parameters with Lp(a) and allele specific apo(a) levels differed between these two ethnic groups. In African-Americans, apoB and apoB/apoA-1 remained consistently and positively associated with both Lp(a) and allele-specific apo(a) levels after adjustments for the contribution of Lp(a)-apoB. The findings suggest an interethnic difference with a closer relationship between Lp(a) and apoB among African-Americans.

AB - Objectives: Lipoprotein(a), Lp(a), represents an apolipoprotein (apo) B-carrying lipoprotein, yet the relationship between Lp(a) and apoB levels has not been fully explored. Methods: We addressed the relationship between Lp(a) and apoB-containing lipoprotein levels in 336 Caucasians and 224 African-Americans. Our approach takes unique molecular properties of Lp(a) as well as contribution of Lp(a) to the levels of these lipoproteins into account. Results: Levels of total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), apoB and apoB/apoA-1 did not differ across ethnicity. African-Americans had higher levels of Lp(a) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and lower triglyceride levels compared to Caucasians. Lp(a) levels were correlated with levels of TC (p<0.005), LDL-C (p<0.001), apoB (p<0.05) or apoB/apoA-1 (p<0.05) in both ethnic groups. These associations remained significant only in African-Americans after adjustments for the contribution of Lp(a)-cholesterol or Lp(a)-apoB. Furthermore, taking Lp(a)-apoB into account, allele-specific apo(a) levels were significantly associated with apoB levels and the apoB/apoA-1 ratio in African-Americans. The latter associations in African-Americans remained significant for allele-specific apo(a) levels for smaller apo(a) sizes (<26 K4 repeats), after controlling for the effects of age, sex, and BMI. Conclusions: Although TC, LDL-C, and apoB levels were comparable between African-Americans and Caucasians, the associations of these parameters with Lp(a) and allele specific apo(a) levels differed between these two ethnic groups. In African-Americans, apoB and apoB/apoA-1 remained consistently and positively associated with both Lp(a) and allele-specific apo(a) levels after adjustments for the contribution of Lp(a)-apoB. The findings suggest an interethnic difference with a closer relationship between Lp(a) and apoB among African-Americans.

KW - Apo(a) sizes

KW - Corrections for the contribution of Lp(a)

KW - Ethnicity

KW - K4 repeats

KW - Plasma lipids

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U2 - 10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2014.04.035

DO - 10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2014.04.035

M3 - Article

VL - 235

SP - 223

EP - 229

JO - Atherosclerosis

JF - Atherosclerosis

SN - 0021-9150

IS - 1

ER -