Shosaiko-to and other Kampo (Japanese herbal) medicines: A review of their immunomodulatory activities

Andrea T. Borchers, Shinya Sakai, Gary L. Henderson, Martha R. Harkey, Carl L Keen, Judy S. Stern, Katsutoshi Terasawa, M. Eric Gershwin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

69 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The use of alternative medicine, including consumption of herbal products and dietary supplements, has been increasing substantially both in the United States and in Western Europe. One area that is garnering increased attention is the use of Oriental Medicine including Kampo, or Japanese herbal medicine. Herein, we review representative examples of research available on the most common use of Kampo medicinals, namely to improve the immune response. We also provide an extensive background on the history of Kampo. There are more than 210 different Kampo formulae used in Japan and most uses of Kampo are to modulate the immune response, i.e. to improve immunity. We have extracted data on seven common Kampo medicinals, and the data are reviewed with respect to in vitro and in vivo activities for both humans and experimental animals; the ingredients as well as the problems with classification of these materials are presented. Research suggests that Kampo herbals are biologically active and may have therapeutic potential. While it is believed that Kampo medicines have few side effects, there is a paucity of data on their toxicity as well as a relative lack of knowledge of the bioactive constituents and potential drug interactions of these agents. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-13
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Ethnopharmacology
Volume73
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

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Kampo Medicine
Herbal Medicine
East Asian Traditional Medicine
shosaiko-to
Complementary Therapies
Dietary Supplements
Drug Interactions
Research
Human Activities
Immunity
Japan
History

Keywords

  • Chinese medical philosophy
  • Immunomodulation
  • Kampo
  • Shosaiko-to

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Shosaiko-to and other Kampo (Japanese herbal) medicines : A review of their immunomodulatory activities. / Borchers, Andrea T.; Sakai, Shinya; Henderson, Gary L.; Harkey, Martha R.; Keen, Carl L; Stern, Judy S.; Terasawa, Katsutoshi; Gershwin, M. Eric.

In: Journal of Ethnopharmacology, Vol. 73, No. 1-2, 2000, p. 1-13.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Borchers, Andrea T. ; Sakai, Shinya ; Henderson, Gary L. ; Harkey, Martha R. ; Keen, Carl L ; Stern, Judy S. ; Terasawa, Katsutoshi ; Gershwin, M. Eric. / Shosaiko-to and other Kampo (Japanese herbal) medicines : A review of their immunomodulatory activities. In: Journal of Ethnopharmacology. 2000 ; Vol. 73, No. 1-2. pp. 1-13.
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