Shortened nighttime sleep duration in early life and subsequent childhood obesity

Janice F Bell, Frederick J. Zimmerman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

137 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To test associations between daytime and nighttime sleep duration and subsequent obesity in children and adolescents. Design: Prospective cohort. Setting: Panel Survey of Income Dynamics Child Development Supplements (1997 and 2002) from US children. Participants: Subjects aged 0 to 13 years (n = 1930) at baseline (1997). Main Exposures: Binary indicators of short daytime and nighttime sleep duration (<25th percentile of age-normalized sleep scores) at baseline. Main Outcome Measures: Body mass index at follow-up (2002) was converted to age- and sex-specific z scores and trichotomized (normal weight, overweight, obese) using established cut points. Ordered logistic regression was used to model body mass index classification as a function of short daytime and nighttime sleep at baseline and follow-up, and important covariates included socioeconomic status, parents' body mass index, and, for children older than 4 years, body mass index at baseline. Results: For younger children (aged 0-4 years at baseline), short duration of nighttime sleep at baseline was strongly associated with increased risk of subsequent overweight or obesity (odds ratio = 1.80; 95% confidence interval, 1.16-2.80). For older children (aged 5-13 years), baseline sleep was not associated with subsequent weight status; however, contemporaneous sleep was inversely associated. Daytime sleep had little effect on subsequent obesity in either group. Conclusions: Shortened sleep duration in early life is a modifiable risk factor with important implications for obesity prevention and treatment. Insufficient nighttime sleep among infants and preschool-aged children may be a lasting risk factor for subsequent obesity. Napping does not appear to be a substitute for nighttime sleep in terms of obesity prevention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)840-845
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine
Volume164
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pediatric Obesity
Sleep
Obesity
Body Mass Index
Weights and Measures
Preschool Children
Child Development
Social Class
Parents
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Confidence Intervals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Shortened nighttime sleep duration in early life and subsequent childhood obesity. / Bell, Janice F; Zimmerman, Frederick J.

In: Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Vol. 164, No. 9, 2010, p. 840-845.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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