Short echo time projection reconstruction MR imaging of cartilage: Comparison with fat-suppressed spoiled GRASS and magnetization transfer contrast MR imaging

Joachim Brossmann, Lawrence R. Frank, John M. Pauly, Robert D Boutin, Robert A. Pedowitz, Parviz Haghighi, Donald Resnick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To evaluate short echo time (TE) projection reconstruction magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the detection of cartilage lesions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-seven cartilage regions of 10 human patellar specimens were examined with the following MR sequences: short TE projection reconstruction (repetition time msec/TE msec, 400/0.15), fat-suppressed three-dimensional spoiled gradient-recalled acquisition in the steady state (Spoiled GRASS) (50/10, 60°flip angle), and magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) subtraction (400/6). MR findings were correlated with histopathologic grading of the cartilage. RESULTS: For detection of cartilage lesions, sensitivity of projection reconstruction imaging (100%) was significantly greater (P = .03) than that of MTC (62%) but not significantly greater (P > .05) than that of Spoiled GRASS (81%) imaging. Accuracy of projection reconstruction was significantly greater than that of MTC (P = .004) and Spoiled GRASS (P = .03) imaging. Unmasking of collagen fibers was most predictive of abnormal signal intensity of the cartilage with all sequences. CONCLUSION: In vitro, short TE projection reconstruction MR imaging provides superior delineation of cartilage lesions when compared with two other sequences. On Spoiled GRASS and MTC images, signal intensity of the superficial layer of cartilage is not a reliable sign for surface integrity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)501-507
Number of pages7
JournalRadiology
Volume203
Issue number2
StatePublished - May 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cartilage
Fats
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Collagen

Keywords

  • Cartilage
  • Joints, MR
  • Knee, MR
  • Magnetic resonance (MR), comparative studies
  • Magnetic resonance (MR), technology
  • Patella

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Short echo time projection reconstruction MR imaging of cartilage : Comparison with fat-suppressed spoiled GRASS and magnetization transfer contrast MR imaging. / Brossmann, Joachim; Frank, Lawrence R.; Pauly, John M.; Boutin, Robert D; Pedowitz, Robert A.; Haghighi, Parviz; Resnick, Donald.

In: Radiology, Vol. 203, No. 2, 05.1997, p. 501-507.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brossmann, Joachim ; Frank, Lawrence R. ; Pauly, John M. ; Boutin, Robert D ; Pedowitz, Robert A. ; Haghighi, Parviz ; Resnick, Donald. / Short echo time projection reconstruction MR imaging of cartilage : Comparison with fat-suppressed spoiled GRASS and magnetization transfer contrast MR imaging. In: Radiology. 1997 ; Vol. 203, No. 2. pp. 501-507.
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abstract = "PURPOSE: To evaluate short echo time (TE) projection reconstruction magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the detection of cartilage lesions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-seven cartilage regions of 10 human patellar specimens were examined with the following MR sequences: short TE projection reconstruction (repetition time msec/TE msec, 400/0.15), fat-suppressed three-dimensional spoiled gradient-recalled acquisition in the steady state (Spoiled GRASS) (50/10, 60°flip angle), and magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) subtraction (400/6). MR findings were correlated with histopathologic grading of the cartilage. RESULTS: For detection of cartilage lesions, sensitivity of projection reconstruction imaging (100{\%}) was significantly greater (P = .03) than that of MTC (62{\%}) but not significantly greater (P > .05) than that of Spoiled GRASS (81{\%}) imaging. Accuracy of projection reconstruction was significantly greater than that of MTC (P = .004) and Spoiled GRASS (P = .03) imaging. Unmasking of collagen fibers was most predictive of abnormal signal intensity of the cartilage with all sequences. CONCLUSION: In vitro, short TE projection reconstruction MR imaging provides superior delineation of cartilage lesions when compared with two other sequences. On Spoiled GRASS and MTC images, signal intensity of the superficial layer of cartilage is not a reliable sign for surface integrity.",
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AU - Pauly, John M.

AU - Boutin, Robert D

AU - Pedowitz, Robert A.

AU - Haghighi, Parviz

AU - Resnick, Donald

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N2 - PURPOSE: To evaluate short echo time (TE) projection reconstruction magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the detection of cartilage lesions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-seven cartilage regions of 10 human patellar specimens were examined with the following MR sequences: short TE projection reconstruction (repetition time msec/TE msec, 400/0.15), fat-suppressed three-dimensional spoiled gradient-recalled acquisition in the steady state (Spoiled GRASS) (50/10, 60°flip angle), and magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) subtraction (400/6). MR findings were correlated with histopathologic grading of the cartilage. RESULTS: For detection of cartilage lesions, sensitivity of projection reconstruction imaging (100%) was significantly greater (P = .03) than that of MTC (62%) but not significantly greater (P > .05) than that of Spoiled GRASS (81%) imaging. Accuracy of projection reconstruction was significantly greater than that of MTC (P = .004) and Spoiled GRASS (P = .03) imaging. Unmasking of collagen fibers was most predictive of abnormal signal intensity of the cartilage with all sequences. CONCLUSION: In vitro, short TE projection reconstruction MR imaging provides superior delineation of cartilage lesions when compared with two other sequences. On Spoiled GRASS and MTC images, signal intensity of the superficial layer of cartilage is not a reliable sign for surface integrity.

AB - PURPOSE: To evaluate short echo time (TE) projection reconstruction magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the detection of cartilage lesions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-seven cartilage regions of 10 human patellar specimens were examined with the following MR sequences: short TE projection reconstruction (repetition time msec/TE msec, 400/0.15), fat-suppressed three-dimensional spoiled gradient-recalled acquisition in the steady state (Spoiled GRASS) (50/10, 60°flip angle), and magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) subtraction (400/6). MR findings were correlated with histopathologic grading of the cartilage. RESULTS: For detection of cartilage lesions, sensitivity of projection reconstruction imaging (100%) was significantly greater (P = .03) than that of MTC (62%) but not significantly greater (P > .05) than that of Spoiled GRASS (81%) imaging. Accuracy of projection reconstruction was significantly greater than that of MTC (P = .004) and Spoiled GRASS (P = .03) imaging. Unmasking of collagen fibers was most predictive of abnormal signal intensity of the cartilage with all sequences. CONCLUSION: In vitro, short TE projection reconstruction MR imaging provides superior delineation of cartilage lesions when compared with two other sequences. On Spoiled GRASS and MTC images, signal intensity of the superficial layer of cartilage is not a reliable sign for surface integrity.

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