Sexual Assault Victims in the Emergency Department

Analysis by Demographic and Event Characteristics

Jennifer Avegno, Trevor Mills, Lisa D Mills

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The objective of this study was to analyze demographic and event characteristics of patients presenting to the Emergency Department (ED) for evaluation after sexual assault, using a Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner standardized database. Data were prospectively collected as part of the Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner program at an urban teaching hospital. This study reviewed all ED patient records with a complaint of sexual assault between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2004. Data were collected on 1172 patients; 92.6% were women, with a mean age of 27 years. The sample was 59.1% black, 38.6% white, and 2.3% "Other." Black victims of sexual assault were significantly more likely to be young (25 years or less) than Whites. Over half (54%) reported involvement of drugs or alcohol during the event. Fifty-three percent knew their assailant(s), and black and young patients were significantly more likely to know the perpetrator(s). Threats of force were common (72.4% of sample), and multiple assailants were uncommon (18.1% of sample). Physical evidence of trauma was present in more than half (51.7%), with increased rates among Whites and older persons. Multivariate analysis showed that race, age, threats, and substance use during the event were independent risk factors for evident trauma on physical examination. Survivors of sexual assault who present to the ED are overwhelmingly female, relatively young, often know the perpetrator of the event, and are likely to be threatened and show signs of physical trauma. Differences between patients according to demographic and event characteristics may have important implications for ED management and treatment plans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)328-334
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Emergency Medicine
Volume37
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Hospital Emergency Service
Demography
Wounds and Injuries
Nurses
Emergency Treatment
Urban Hospitals
Teaching Hospitals
Physical Examination
Survivors
Multivariate Analysis
Alcohols
Databases
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • interpersonal violence
  • patient demographics
  • sexual assault

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Sexual Assault Victims in the Emergency Department : Analysis by Demographic and Event Characteristics. / Avegno, Jennifer; Mills, Trevor; Mills, Lisa D.

In: Journal of Emergency Medicine, Vol. 37, No. 3, 10.2009, p. 328-334.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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