Sex Offender Registration and Community Notification Challenges: The Supreme Court Continues Its Trend

Charles L Scott, Joan B. Gerbasi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

All states and the District of Columbia have passed sex offender registration and community notification laws. While the specific provisions of these statutes vary, all have public safety as a primary goal. The authors discuss two recent cases heard by the United States Supreme Court that challenged the constitutionality of Alaska's and Connecticut's statutes. The laws were challenged as violations of the United States Constitution's prohibition on ex post facto laws and its Fourteenth Amendment guarantee of procedural due process. In both cases, the statutes were upheld. As it has found in challenges to sexually violent predator statutes, the Court emphasized that the registration and community notification schemes are civil and not criminal in nature. The article concludes with a discussion of possible implications for clinicians involved in evaluating or treating sex offenders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)494-501
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law
Volume31
Issue number4
StatePublished - 2003

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statute
Supreme Court
offender
trend
Supreme Court Decisions
community
Civil Rights
Constitution and Bylaws
constitutionality
Law
European Law
amendment
Safety
guarantee
constitution
district

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Law
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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