Serotonin transport and metabolism in the mammary gland modulates secretory activation and involution

Aaron M. Marshall, Laurie A. Nommsen-Rivers, Laura L. Hernandez, Kathryn G. Dewey, Caroline J Chantry, Karen A. Gregerson, Nelson D. Horseman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Context: Serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] is an important local regulator of lactation homeostasis; however, the roles for the serotonin reuptake transporter and monoamine oxidase have not been known. Objective: The aim of the study was to determine whether drugs that impact 5-HT affect human lactation physiology. Design and Setting: We conducted laboratory studies of human and animal models and an observational study of the onset of copious milk secretion in postpartum women at a university medical center. Participants: We studied women expecting their first live-born infant; exclusion criteria were: referred to the medical center for another medical condition, known contraindication to breastfeed, and less than 19 yr of age and unable to obtain parental consent. Intervention(s): The mothers were interviewed. The cell and animal studies consisted of a variety of biochemical, pharmacological, and genetic interventions. Main Outcome Measure(s): The human subjects outcome was prevalence of delayed onset of copious milk secretion. The cell and animal outcomes were physiological and morphological. Results: Inhibiting serotonin reuptake in mammary epithelial cells altered barrier function, and the effects were amplified by coadministering a monoamine oxidase inhibitor. Direct delivery of fluoxetine by slow-release pellets caused localized involution. TPH1 knockout mice displayed precocious secretory activation. Among a cohort of 431 women, those taking SSRI were more likely (P= 0.02) to experience delayed secretory activation. Conclusions: Medications that perturb serotonin balance dysregulate lactation, and the effects are consistent with those predicted by the physiological effects of intramammary 5-HT bioactivity. Mothers taking serotonergic drugs may need additional support to achieve their breastfeeding goals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)837-846
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume95
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2010

Fingerprint

Human Mammary Glands
Metabolism
Serotonin
Chemical activation
Lactation
Animals
Milk
Parental Consent
Mothers
Serotonin Agents
Serotonin Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins
Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors
Genetic Engineering
Fluoxetine
Monoamine Oxidase
Breast Feeding
Knockout Mice
Physiology
Postpartum Period
Observational Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology
  • Biochemistry, medical
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Marshall, A. M., Nommsen-Rivers, L. A., Hernandez, L. L., Dewey, K. G., Chantry, C. J., Gregerson, K. A., & Horseman, N. D. (2010). Serotonin transport and metabolism in the mammary gland modulates secretory activation and involution. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 95(2), 837-846. https://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2009-1575

Serotonin transport and metabolism in the mammary gland modulates secretory activation and involution. / Marshall, Aaron M.; Nommsen-Rivers, Laurie A.; Hernandez, Laura L.; Dewey, Kathryn G.; Chantry, Caroline J; Gregerson, Karen A.; Horseman, Nelson D.

In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 95, No. 2, 02.2010, p. 837-846.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Marshall, Aaron M. ; Nommsen-Rivers, Laurie A. ; Hernandez, Laura L. ; Dewey, Kathryn G. ; Chantry, Caroline J ; Gregerson, Karen A. ; Horseman, Nelson D. / Serotonin transport and metabolism in the mammary gland modulates secretory activation and involution. In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2010 ; Vol. 95, No. 2. pp. 837-846.
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