Serological survey of vector-borne zoonotic pathogens in pet cats and cats from animal shelters and feral colonies

Joseph Brad Case, Bruno B Chomel, William Nicholson, Janet E Foley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

62 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although cats and their arthropod parasites can sometimes be important sources of zoonotic diseases in humans, the extent of exposure among various cat populations to many potential zoonotic agents remains incompletely described. In this study, 170 domestic cats living in private homes, feral cat colonies, and animal shelters from California and Wisconsin were evaluated by serology to determine the levels of exposure to a group of zoonotic vector-borne pathogens. Serological positive test results were observed in 17.2% of cats for Rickettsia rickettsii, 14.9% for R akari, 4.9% for R typhi, 11.1% for R felis, and 14.7% for Bartonella henselae. Although vector-borne disease exposure has been documented previously in cats, the evaluation of multiple pathogens and diverse cat populations simultaneously performed here contributes to our understanding of feline exposure to these zoonotic pathogens.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)111-117
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

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