Seroepidemiology of Bartonella vinsonii subsp berkhoffii exposure among healthy dogs

Thomas E. Honadel, Bruno B Chomel, Kazuhiro Yamamoto, Chao Chin Chang, Thomas B Farver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective - To determine seroprevalence of antibodies to Bartonella vinsonii subsp berkhoffii and risk factors for seropositivity among working dogs owned by the US government. Design - Cross-sectional study. Animals - 1,872 dogs. Procedure - An ELISA was used to detect antibodies to B vinsonii subsp berkhoffii. Results - Antibodies to B vinsonii subsp berkhoffii were detected in 162 dogs (8.7%; 95% confidence interval, 7.4 to 10.0%). Dogs living in the southeast, plains states, southwest, and south-central were significantly more likely to be seropositive than were dogs living in other regions of the United States. German Shepherd-type dogs were significantly less likely to be seropositive than were dogs of other breeds, and dogs entering training programs or that had been rejected from a training program were significantly more likely to be seropositive than were dogs used for narcotics detection and dogs trained to patrol or detect explosives. Dogs used by the border patrol or Federal Aviation Administration were more likely to be seropositive than were dogs used by the Department of Defense or customs service. Odds that dogs would be seropositive were significantly higher for dogs stationed in the southern United States, the northeastern United States, or a foreign country, compared with dogs stationed in all other regions of the United States. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Overall, 8.7% of this diverse group of healthy dogs was found to be seropositive for antibodies to B vinsonii subsp berkhoffii, and seropositivity rates were associated with location, suggesting either that there are multiple vectors for the organism or that the major vector for the organism depends on geographic and environmental factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)480-484
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume219
Issue number4
StatePublished - Aug 15 2001

Fingerprint

Bartonella vinsonii
Bartonella
serological surveys
Dogs
dogs
seroprevalence
antibodies
Antibodies
education programs
aviation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Seroepidemiology of Bartonella vinsonii subsp berkhoffii exposure among healthy dogs. / Honadel, Thomas E.; Chomel, Bruno B; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Chang, Chao Chin; Farver, Thomas B.

In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Vol. 219, No. 4, 15.08.2001, p. 480-484.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{6261e2ed0315401798bca93c03c9567a,
title = "Seroepidemiology of Bartonella vinsonii subsp berkhoffii exposure among healthy dogs",
abstract = "Objective - To determine seroprevalence of antibodies to Bartonella vinsonii subsp berkhoffii and risk factors for seropositivity among working dogs owned by the US government. Design - Cross-sectional study. Animals - 1,872 dogs. Procedure - An ELISA was used to detect antibodies to B vinsonii subsp berkhoffii. Results - Antibodies to B vinsonii subsp berkhoffii were detected in 162 dogs (8.7{\%}; 95{\%} confidence interval, 7.4 to 10.0{\%}). Dogs living in the southeast, plains states, southwest, and south-central were significantly more likely to be seropositive than were dogs living in other regions of the United States. German Shepherd-type dogs were significantly less likely to be seropositive than were dogs of other breeds, and dogs entering training programs or that had been rejected from a training program were significantly more likely to be seropositive than were dogs used for narcotics detection and dogs trained to patrol or detect explosives. Dogs used by the border patrol or Federal Aviation Administration were more likely to be seropositive than were dogs used by the Department of Defense or customs service. Odds that dogs would be seropositive were significantly higher for dogs stationed in the southern United States, the northeastern United States, or a foreign country, compared with dogs stationed in all other regions of the United States. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Overall, 8.7{\%} of this diverse group of healthy dogs was found to be seropositive for antibodies to B vinsonii subsp berkhoffii, and seropositivity rates were associated with location, suggesting either that there are multiple vectors for the organism or that the major vector for the organism depends on geographic and environmental factors.",
author = "Honadel, {Thomas E.} and Chomel, {Bruno B} and Kazuhiro Yamamoto and Chang, {Chao Chin} and Farver, {Thomas B}",
year = "2001",
month = "8",
day = "15",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "219",
pages = "480--484",
journal = "Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association",
issn = "0003-1488",
publisher = "American Veterinary Medical Association",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Seroepidemiology of Bartonella vinsonii subsp berkhoffii exposure among healthy dogs

AU - Honadel, Thomas E.

AU - Chomel, Bruno B

AU - Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

AU - Chang, Chao Chin

AU - Farver, Thomas B

PY - 2001/8/15

Y1 - 2001/8/15

N2 - Objective - To determine seroprevalence of antibodies to Bartonella vinsonii subsp berkhoffii and risk factors for seropositivity among working dogs owned by the US government. Design - Cross-sectional study. Animals - 1,872 dogs. Procedure - An ELISA was used to detect antibodies to B vinsonii subsp berkhoffii. Results - Antibodies to B vinsonii subsp berkhoffii were detected in 162 dogs (8.7%; 95% confidence interval, 7.4 to 10.0%). Dogs living in the southeast, plains states, southwest, and south-central were significantly more likely to be seropositive than were dogs living in other regions of the United States. German Shepherd-type dogs were significantly less likely to be seropositive than were dogs of other breeds, and dogs entering training programs or that had been rejected from a training program were significantly more likely to be seropositive than were dogs used for narcotics detection and dogs trained to patrol or detect explosives. Dogs used by the border patrol or Federal Aviation Administration were more likely to be seropositive than were dogs used by the Department of Defense or customs service. Odds that dogs would be seropositive were significantly higher for dogs stationed in the southern United States, the northeastern United States, or a foreign country, compared with dogs stationed in all other regions of the United States. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Overall, 8.7% of this diverse group of healthy dogs was found to be seropositive for antibodies to B vinsonii subsp berkhoffii, and seropositivity rates were associated with location, suggesting either that there are multiple vectors for the organism or that the major vector for the organism depends on geographic and environmental factors.

AB - Objective - To determine seroprevalence of antibodies to Bartonella vinsonii subsp berkhoffii and risk factors for seropositivity among working dogs owned by the US government. Design - Cross-sectional study. Animals - 1,872 dogs. Procedure - An ELISA was used to detect antibodies to B vinsonii subsp berkhoffii. Results - Antibodies to B vinsonii subsp berkhoffii were detected in 162 dogs (8.7%; 95% confidence interval, 7.4 to 10.0%). Dogs living in the southeast, plains states, southwest, and south-central were significantly more likely to be seropositive than were dogs living in other regions of the United States. German Shepherd-type dogs were significantly less likely to be seropositive than were dogs of other breeds, and dogs entering training programs or that had been rejected from a training program were significantly more likely to be seropositive than were dogs used for narcotics detection and dogs trained to patrol or detect explosives. Dogs used by the border patrol or Federal Aviation Administration were more likely to be seropositive than were dogs used by the Department of Defense or customs service. Odds that dogs would be seropositive were significantly higher for dogs stationed in the southern United States, the northeastern United States, or a foreign country, compared with dogs stationed in all other regions of the United States. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Overall, 8.7% of this diverse group of healthy dogs was found to be seropositive for antibodies to B vinsonii subsp berkhoffii, and seropositivity rates were associated with location, suggesting either that there are multiple vectors for the organism or that the major vector for the organism depends on geographic and environmental factors.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035882879&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0035882879&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 219

SP - 480

EP - 484

JO - Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

JF - Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

SN - 0003-1488

IS - 4

ER -