SentimagIC: A Non-inferiority Trial Comparing Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Versus Technetium-99m and Blue Dye in the Detection of Axillary Sentinel Nodes in Patients with Early-Stage Breast Cancer

Michael D. Alvarado, Elizabeth A. Mittendorf, Mediget Teshome, Alastair M. Thompson, Richard J Bold, Mark A. Gittleman, Peter D. Beitsch, Sarah L. Blair, Kaisa Kivilaid, Quentin J. Harmer, Kelly K. Hunt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) is a highly accurate method for staging the axilla in early breast cancer. Superparamagnetic iron oxide mapping agents have been explored to overcome the disadvantages of the standard SLNB technique, which uses a radioisotope tracer with or without blue dye. One such agent, Sienna+, was shown to be non-inferior to the standard technique for SLNB in a number of studies. The SentimagIC trial was designed to establish the non-inferiority of a new formulation of this magnetic tracer, Magtrace (formerly SiennaXP). Methods: Patients with clinically node-negative early-stage breast cancer were recruited from six centers in the US. Patients received radioisotope and isosulfan blue dye injections, followed by an intraoperative injection of magnetic tracer, prior to SLNB. The sentinel node identification rate was compared between the magnetic and standard techniques to evaluate non-inferiority and concordance. Results: Data were collected for 146 procedures in 146 patients. The per patient detection rate was 99.3% (145/146) when using the magnetic tracer and 98.6% (144/146) when using the standard technique, while the nodal detection rate was 94.3% (348/369 nodes) when using the magnetic tracer and 93.5% (345/369) when using the standard technique (difference 0.8%, 95% binomial confidence interval lower bound − 2.1%). Of the 22 patients with positive sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs), 21 (95.4%) were detected by both the magnetic tracer and the standard technique. All malignant nodes detected by standard technique were also identified by the magnetic technique. Conclusion: The magnetic technique is non-inferior to the standard technique of radioisotope and blue dye for axillary SLN detection in early-stage breast cancer. The magnetic technique is therefore a viable alternative.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAnnals of Surgical Oncology
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Oncology

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