Sensitivity and specificity of recalled vasomotor symptoms in a multiethnic cohort

Sybil L. Crawford, Nancy E. Avis, Ellen B Gold, Janet Johnston, Jennifer Kelsey, Nanette Santoro, MaryFran Sowers, Barbara Sternfeld

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many epidemiologic studies include symptom checklists assessing recall of symptoms over a specified time period. Little research exists regarding the congruence of short-term symptom recall with daily self-reporting. The authors assessed the sensitivity and specificity of retrospective reporting of vasomotor symptoms using data from 567 participants in the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (1997-2002). Daily assessments were considered the "gold standard" for comparison with retrospective vasomotor symptom reporting. Logistic regression was used to identify predictors of sensitivity and specificity for retrospective reporting of any vasomotor symptoms versus none in the past 2 weeks. Sensitivity and specificity were relatively constant over a 3-year period. Sensitivity ranged from 78% to 84% and specificity from 85% to 89%. Sensitivity was lower among women with fewer symptomatic days in the daily assessments and higher among women reporting vasomotor symptoms in the daily assessment on the day of retrospective reporting. Specificity was negatively associated with general symptom awareness and past smoking and was positively associated with routine physical activity and Japanese ethnicity. Because many investigators rely on symptom recall, it is important to evaluate reporting accuracy, which was relatively high for vasomotor symptoms in this study. The approach presented here would be useful for examining other symptoms or behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1452-1459
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
Volume168
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2008

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Sensitivity and Specificity
Women's Health
Checklist
Epidemiologic Studies
Logistic Models
Smoking
Research Personnel
Exercise
Research

Keywords

  • Data collection
  • Hot flashes
  • Mental recall
  • Sensitivity and specificity
  • Sweating
  • Vasomotor system

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Crawford, S. L., Avis, N. E., Gold, E. B., Johnston, J., Kelsey, J., Santoro, N., ... Sternfeld, B. (2008). Sensitivity and specificity of recalled vasomotor symptoms in a multiethnic cohort. American Journal of Epidemiology, 168(12), 1452-1459. https://doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwn279

Sensitivity and specificity of recalled vasomotor symptoms in a multiethnic cohort. / Crawford, Sybil L.; Avis, Nancy E.; Gold, Ellen B; Johnston, Janet; Kelsey, Jennifer; Santoro, Nanette; Sowers, MaryFran; Sternfeld, Barbara.

In: American Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 168, No. 12, 12.2008, p. 1452-1459.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Crawford, SL, Avis, NE, Gold, EB, Johnston, J, Kelsey, J, Santoro, N, Sowers, M & Sternfeld, B 2008, 'Sensitivity and specificity of recalled vasomotor symptoms in a multiethnic cohort', American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 168, no. 12, pp. 1452-1459. https://doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwn279
Crawford, Sybil L. ; Avis, Nancy E. ; Gold, Ellen B ; Johnston, Janet ; Kelsey, Jennifer ; Santoro, Nanette ; Sowers, MaryFran ; Sternfeld, Barbara. / Sensitivity and specificity of recalled vasomotor symptoms in a multiethnic cohort. In: American Journal of Epidemiology. 2008 ; Vol. 168, No. 12. pp. 1452-1459.
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