Sensitivity and specificity of real-time PCR and bacteriological culture for francisellosis in farm-raised Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus L.)

G. B.N. Assis, T. F. de Oliveira, Ian Gardner, H. C.P. Figueiredo, C. A.G. Leal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Despite the worldwide occurrence of Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis (Fno) infection in farmed tilapia, sensitivity and specificity estimates of commonly used diagnostic tests have not been reported. This study aimed to estimate the sensitivity and specificity of bacteriological culture and qPCR to detect Fno infection. We tested 559 fish, sampled from four farms with different epidemiological scenarios: (i) healthy fish in a hatchery free of Fno; (ii) targeted sampling of diseased fish with suggestive external clinical signs of francisellosis during an outbreak; (iii) convenience sampling of diseased and clinically healthy fish during an outbreak; and (iv) sampling of healthy fish in a cage farm without a history of outbreaks, but with francisellosis reported in other farms in the same reservoir. The qPCR had higher median sensitivity (range, 48.8–99.5%) than culture (range, 1.6–74.4%). Culture had a substantially lower median sensitivity (1.6%) than qPCR (48.8%) to detect Fno in carrier tilapia (farm 4). Median specificity estimates for both tests were >99.2%. The qPCR is the superior test for use in surveillance and monitoring programmes for francisellosis in farmed Nile tilapia, but both tests have high sensitivity and specificity which make them fit for use in the diagnosis of Fno outbreaks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)785-795
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Fish Diseases
Volume40
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Bayesian latent class analysis
  • diagnostic sensitivity
  • diagnostic specificity
  • Francisella
  • tilapia farming

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aquatic Science
  • veterinary (miscalleneous)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Sensitivity and specificity of real-time PCR and bacteriological culture for francisellosis in farm-raised Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus L.)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this