Self-perceived Difficulties in Everyday Function Precede Cognitive Decline among Older Adults in the ACTIVE Study

Sarah E Tomaszewski Farias, Tania Giovannetti, Brennan R. Payne, Michael Marsiske, George W. Rebok, K. Warner Schaie, Kelsey R. Thomas, Sherry L. Willis, Joseph M. Dzierzewski, Frederick Unverzagt, Alden L. Gross

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Careful characterization of how functional decline co-evolves with cognitive decline in older adults has yet to be well described. Most models of neurodegenerative disease postulate that cognitive decline predates and potentially leads to declines in everyday functional abilities; however, there is mounting evidence that subtle decline in instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) may be detectable in older individuals who are still cognitively normal. Methods: The present study examines how the relationship between change in cognition and change in IADLs are best characterized among older adults who participated in the ACTIVE trial. Neuropsychological and IADL data were analyzed for 2802 older adults who were cognitively normal at study baseline and followed for up to 10 years. Results: Findings demonstrate that subtle, self-perceived difficulties in performing IADLs preceded and predicted subsequent declines on cognitive tests of memory, reasoning, and speed of processing. Conclusions: Findings are consistent with a growing body of literature suggesting that subjective changes in everyday abilities can be associated with more precipitous decline on objective cognitive measures and the development of mild cognitive impairment and dementia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)104-112
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the International Neuropsychological Society
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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Activities of Daily Living
Aptitude
Prednisolone
Neurodegenerative Diseases
Cognition
Dementia
Cognitive Dysfunction

Keywords

  • Dementia
  • Everyday function
  • IADL
  • Longitudinal
  • Mild cognitive impairment
  • Older adult

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Self-perceived Difficulties in Everyday Function Precede Cognitive Decline among Older Adults in the ACTIVE Study. / Tomaszewski Farias, Sarah E; Giovannetti, Tania; Payne, Brennan R.; Marsiske, Michael; Rebok, George W.; Schaie, K. Warner; Thomas, Kelsey R.; Willis, Sherry L.; Dzierzewski, Joseph M.; Unverzagt, Frederick; Gross, Alden L.

In: Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, Vol. 24, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 104-112.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tomaszewski Farias, SE, Giovannetti, T, Payne, BR, Marsiske, M, Rebok, GW, Schaie, KW, Thomas, KR, Willis, SL, Dzierzewski, JM, Unverzagt, F & Gross, AL 2018, 'Self-perceived Difficulties in Everyday Function Precede Cognitive Decline among Older Adults in the ACTIVE Study', Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, vol. 24, no. 1, pp. 104-112. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1355617717000546
Tomaszewski Farias, Sarah E ; Giovannetti, Tania ; Payne, Brennan R. ; Marsiske, Michael ; Rebok, George W. ; Schaie, K. Warner ; Thomas, Kelsey R. ; Willis, Sherry L. ; Dzierzewski, Joseph M. ; Unverzagt, Frederick ; Gross, Alden L. / Self-perceived Difficulties in Everyday Function Precede Cognitive Decline among Older Adults in the ACTIVE Study. In: Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society. 2018 ; Vol. 24, No. 1. pp. 104-112.
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