Self-organization of an acentrosomal microtubule network at the basal cortex of polarized epithelial cells

Amy Reilein, Soichiro Yamada, W. James Nelson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mechanisms underlying the organization of centrosome-derived microtubule arrays are well understood, but less is known about how acentrosomal microtubule networks are formed. The basal cortex of polarized epithelial cells contains a microtubule network of mixed polarity. We examined how this network is organized by imaging microtubule dynamics in acentrosomal basal cytoplasts derived from these cells. We show that the steady-state microtubule network appears to form by a combination of microtubule-microtubule and microtubule-cortex interactions, both of which increase microtubule stability. We used computational modeling to determine whether these microtubule parameters are sufficient to generate a steady-state acentrosomal microtubule network. Microtubules undergoing dynamic instability without any stabilization points continuously remodel their organization without reaching a steady-state network. However, the addition of increased microtubule stabilization at microtubule-microtubule and microtubule-cortex interactions results in the rapid assembly of a steady-state microtubule network in silico that is remarkably similar to networks formed in situ. These results define minimal parameters for the self-organization of an acentrosomal microtubule network.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)845-855
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Cell Biology
Volume171
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 5 2005
Externally publishedYes

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Microtubules
Epithelial Cells
Centrosome
Computer Simulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology

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Self-organization of an acentrosomal microtubule network at the basal cortex of polarized epithelial cells. / Reilein, Amy; Yamada, Soichiro; Nelson, W. James.

In: Journal of Cell Biology, Vol. 171, No. 5, 05.12.2005, p. 845-855.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Reilein, Amy ; Yamada, Soichiro ; Nelson, W. James. / Self-organization of an acentrosomal microtubule network at the basal cortex of polarized epithelial cells. In: Journal of Cell Biology. 2005 ; Vol. 171, No. 5. pp. 845-855.
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