Self-detection remains a key method of breast cancer detection for U.S. women

Mara Y. Roth, Joann G. Elmore, Joyce P. Yi-Frazier, Lisa M. Reisch, Natalia V. Oster, Diana L Miglioretti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The method by which breast cancer is detected becomes a factor for long-term survival and should be considered in treatment plans. This report describes patient characteristics and time trends for various methods of breast cancer detection in the United States. Methods: The 2003 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), a nationally representative self-report health survey, included 361 women survivors diagnosed with breast cancer between 1980 and 2003. Responses to the question, How was your breast cancer found? were categorized as accident, self-examination, physician during routine breast examination, mammogram, and other. We examined responses by income, race, age, and year of diagnosis. Results: Most women survivors (57%) reported a detection method other than mammographic examination. Women often detected breast cancers themselves, either by self-examination (25%) or by accident (18%). Conclusions: Despite increased use of screening mammography, a large percentage of breast cancers are detected by the patients themselves. Patient-noted breast abnormalities should be carefully evaluated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1135-1139
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Women's Health
Volume20
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Breast Neoplasms
Self-Examination
Health Surveys
Survivors
Breast
Mammography
Self Report
Accidents
Interviews
Physicians
Survival
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Self-detection remains a key method of breast cancer detection for U.S. women. / Roth, Mara Y.; Elmore, Joann G.; Yi-Frazier, Joyce P.; Reisch, Lisa M.; Oster, Natalia V.; Miglioretti, Diana L.

In: Journal of Women's Health, Vol. 20, No. 8, 01.08.2011, p. 1135-1139.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Roth, Mara Y. ; Elmore, Joann G. ; Yi-Frazier, Joyce P. ; Reisch, Lisa M. ; Oster, Natalia V. ; Miglioretti, Diana L. / Self-detection remains a key method of breast cancer detection for U.S. women. In: Journal of Women's Health. 2011 ; Vol. 20, No. 8. pp. 1135-1139.
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