Self blood glucose monitoring underestimates hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia as compared to continuous glucose monitoring in type 1 and type 2 diabetes

Devna Mangrola, Christine Cox, Arianne S. Furman, Sridevi Krishnan, Siddika E Karakas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objective: When glucose records from self blood glucose monitoring (SBGM) do not reflect estimated average glucose from glycosylated hemoglobin (HgBA1) or when patients' clinical symptoms are not explained by their SBGM records, clinical management of diabetes becomes a challenge. Our objective was to determine the magnitude of differences in glucose values reported by SBGM versus those documented by continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). Methods: The CGM was conducted by a clinical diabetes educator (CDE)/registered nurse by the clinic protocol, using the Medtronic iPRO2TM system. Patients continued SBGM and managed their diabetes without any change. Data from 4 full days were obtained, and relevant clinical information was recorded. De-identified data sets were provided to the investigators. Results: Data from 61 patients, 27 with type 1 diabetes (T1DM) and 34 with T2DM were analyzed. The lowest, highest, and average glucose recorded by SBGM were compared to the corresponding values from CGM. The lowest glucose values reported by SBGM were approxi-mately 25 mg/dL higher in both T1DM (P = .0232) and T2DM (P = .0003). The highest glucose values by SBGM were approximately 30 mg/dL lower in T1DM (P = .0005) and 55 mg/dL lower in T2DM (P<.0001). HgBA1c correlated with the highest and average glucose by SBGM and CGM. The lowest glucose values were seen most frequently during sleep and before breakfast; the highest were seen during the evening and postprandially. Conclusion: SBGM accurately estimates the average glucose but underestimates glucose excursions. CGM uncovers glucose patterns that common SBGM patterns cannot.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)47-52
Number of pages6
JournalEndocrine Practice
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Hypoglycemia
Hyperglycemia
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Glucose
Forms and Records Control
Breakfast
Glycosylated Hemoglobin A

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Self blood glucose monitoring underestimates hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia as compared to continuous glucose monitoring in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. / Mangrola, Devna; Cox, Christine; Furman, Arianne S.; Krishnan, Sridevi; Karakas, Siddika E.

In: Endocrine Practice, Vol. 24, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 47-52.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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