Selective lesion of the hippocampus increases the differentiation of immature neurons in the monkey amygdala

Loïc J. Chareyron, David G Amaral, Pierre Lavenex, Pasko Rakic

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A large population of immature neurons is present in the ventro-medial portion of the adult primate amygdala, a region that receives substantial direct projections from the hippocampal formation. Here, we show the effects of neonatal (n = 8) and adult (n = 6) hippocam-pal lesions on the populations of mature and immature neurons in the paralaminar, lateral, and basal nuclei of the adult monkey amygdala. Compared with unoperated controls (n = 7), the number of mature neurons was about 70% higher in the paralaminar nucleus of neonate- and adult-lesioned monkeys, and 40% higher in the lateral and basal nuclei of neonate-lesioned monkeys. The number of immature neurons in the paralaminar nucleus was 40% higher in neonate-lesioned monkeys and 30% lower in adult-lesioned monkeys. Similar changes in neuron numbers were also found in two monkeys with nonexperimental, selective, bilateral hippocampal damage. These changes in neuron numbers following hippocampal lesions appear to reflect the differentiation of immature neurons present in the paralaminar nucleus. After adult lesions, the differentiation of immature neurons was essentially restricted to the paralaminar nucleus and was associated with a decrease in the population of immature neurons. In contrast, after neonatal lesions, the differentiation of immature neurons involved the paralaminar, lateral, and basal nuclei. It was associated with an increase in the population of immature neurons in the paralaminar nucleus. Such lesion-induced neuronal plasticity sheds new light on potential mechanisms that may facilitate functional recovery following focal brain injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)14420-14425
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume113
Issue number50
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 13 2016

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Amygdala
Haplorhini
Hippocampus
Neurons
Basal Ganglia
Population
Neuronal Plasticity
Population Dynamics
Basolateral Nuclear Complex
Brain Injuries
Primates

Keywords

  • Immature neuron
  • Migration
  • Neurodevelopmental disorders
  • Plasticity
  • Subventricular zone

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Selective lesion of the hippocampus increases the differentiation of immature neurons in the monkey amygdala. / Chareyron, Loïc J.; Amaral, David G; Lavenex, Pierre; Rakic, Pasko.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 113, No. 50, 13.12.2016, p. 14420-14425.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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