Selective Control of the Upper Extremity Scale: Validation of a clinical assessment tool for children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy

Lisa V. Wagner, Jon Davids, James W. Hardin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: The ability to determine the relationship between selective motor control and upper extremity function in children with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP), and to measure the functional outcome and efficacy of interventions designed to improve selective motor control, has been limited by the lack of an objective, validated tool. The primary objective of this study is to describe the development of a clinical tool entitled Selective Control of the Upper Extremity Scale (SCUES), and present evidence of its validity and reliability. Method: Content validity was established through an expert panel (eight clinicians, mean and median of 17y of clinical experience, range 2-30y). Intra- and interrater reliability was determined by six occupational therapists who scored 10 participant studies. Construct validity of the SCUES was established by comparison to the spontaneous functional analysis section of the Shriners Hospitals Upper Extremity Evaluation, the Manual Ability Classification System, and the Box and Block test for 25 children with unilateral CP. Results: The content validity ratio values were greater than 0 (indicating >50% agreement) for 33 of the 34 items (97%), and equal or greater than 0.5 (indicating ≥75% agreement) for 26 of the 34 items (76%). Intrarater reliability was excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] >0.75) for all segments and joints of the affected extremity. Interrater reliability was excellent for all segments and joints of the affected extremity except the shoulder (ICC=0.72). The SCUES was strongly correlated with the SHUEE (Spearman's rho=0.69, p=0.003). The SCUES was not correlated with the Manual Ability Classification System (rho=-0.24, p=0.369) or the Box and Block test (rho=0.47, p=0.066). Interpretation: Psychometric analysis of the SCUES revealed comparable validity to other accepted video-based clinical assessment tools for the upper extremity in children with CP.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)612-617
Number of pages6
JournalDevelopmental Medicine and Child Neurology
Volume58
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Cerebral Palsy
Upper Extremity
Aptitude
Extremities
Joints
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental Neuroscience

Cite this

Selective Control of the Upper Extremity Scale : Validation of a clinical assessment tool for children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy. / Wagner, Lisa V.; Davids, Jon; Hardin, James W.

In: Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, Vol. 58, No. 6, 01.06.2016, p. 612-617.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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