Selective abnormalities in the thymic microenvironment associated with avian scleroderma, an inherited fibrotic disease of L200 chickens

R. L. Boyd, T. J. Wilson, Judith A Van de Water, L. A. Haapanen, M. Eric Gershwin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

As a prelude to deciphering the mechanisms of intrathymic T-cell maturation we produced a panel of 18 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against chicken thymic stromal elements. Eleven of these detected epithelial cells. They were: pan-epithelial; subcapsule and peri-vascular (pan type 1 epithelium); subcapsular, perivascular and medulla; medulla; or cortex. Of particular interest were the sub-specificities within these regions, especially the subcapsular region. Four mAbs stained both epithelial and non-epithelial cells in discrete regions. In addition, three mAbs recognized only non-epithelial cells. One identified macrophages scattered throughout the thymus, another the connective tissue and another the medullary vascular endothelium. These reagents have provided an extensive profile of the thymic stromal architecture and revealed that these cells are equally as complex as the T cells whose differentiation they induce and regulate. While the mAbs provide a valuable means for studying the mechanisms of normal thymopoiesis, their clinical significance is unknown. UCD line 200 chickens develop an autoimmune disease manifest by dermal and internal organ fibrosis, T cell infiltrates of skin and other affected organs and production of multiple autoantibodies. We have used our panel of mAbs to evaluate the thymic microenvironment in these autoimmunity-prone chickens. A comparative analysis with control chickens revealed striking deficiencies in the L200 subcapsular regions coupled with excessive expression of MHC class II antigens, particularly in the cortex. We hypothesize that these abnormalities induce altered T-cell differentiation, thereby predisposing the L200 chickens to autoimmune disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)369-380
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Autoimmunity
Volume4
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1991

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Chickens
Monoclonal Antibodies
T-Lymphocytes
Autoimmune Diseases
Cell Differentiation
Skin
Histocompatibility Antigens Class II
Vascular Endothelium
Autoimmunity
Connective Tissue
Autoantibodies
Thymus Gland
Blood Vessels
Fibrosis
Epithelium
Epithelial Cells
Macrophages

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Selective abnormalities in the thymic microenvironment associated with avian scleroderma, an inherited fibrotic disease of L200 chickens. / Boyd, R. L.; Wilson, T. J.; Van de Water, Judith A; Haapanen, L. A.; Gershwin, M. Eric.

In: Journal of Autoimmunity, Vol. 4, No. 2, 1991, p. 369-380.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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