Seasonal variations in variceal bleeding mortality and hospitalization in France

Ronald K. Hsu, Andy Yu, John G. Lee, Joseph Leung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The circadian variation in portal blood pressure and in the diurnal incidence of variceal bleeding is well known, but the seasonal variation in variceal bleeding is still controversial. This report analyzes the seasonal variations in mortality and hospitalizations due to variceal bleeding in the French population. METHODS: All the deaths due to variceal bleeding that occurred from 1987 to 1996 (N = 13,514) and all adults discharged from French public hospitals for variceal bleeding from 1995 to 1997 (N = 17,026) were examined retrospectively. Cumulated monthly averages were expressed as the percentage above or below the average monthly value during the entire study period. RESULTS: Deaths due to variceal bleeding in France occurred with a clear annual periodicity and peaked in winter (December/January), both in the overall population and in subgroups defined by age and sex, except for women. The distribution of cumulative monthly deaths differed by 24%, with a peak (14% above average) in December and a trough (10% below average) in July (Roger's test: p < 0.001). Hospitalizations for variceal bleeding in French public hospitals followed a similar seasonal pattern (p < 0.001) with a winter-spring predominance (4% to 7% from December through April), except in patients aged 15-49 yr. There was a short sharp peak of mortality in early winter in French public hospitals. The seasonality of hospitalization and death increased markedly with age. CONCLUSIONS: A better understanding of these age- and sex-specific seasonal patterns would allow to improve pharmacological protection measures, disease management, and educational strategies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1881-1887
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume96
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

France
Hospitalization
Hemorrhage
Mortality
Public Hospitals
Portal Pressure
Periodicity
Disease Management
Population
Pharmacology
Blood Pressure
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Seasonal variations in variceal bleeding mortality and hospitalization in France. / Hsu, Ronald K.; Yu, Andy; Lee, John G.; Leung, Joseph.

In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, Vol. 96, No. 6, 2001, p. 1881-1887.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hsu, Ronald K. ; Yu, Andy ; Lee, John G. ; Leung, Joseph. / Seasonal variations in variceal bleeding mortality and hospitalization in France. In: American Journal of Gastroenterology. 2001 ; Vol. 96, No. 6. pp. 1881-1887.
@article{23f0127582b84a48a9d627581ce839b8,
title = "Seasonal variations in variceal bleeding mortality and hospitalization in France",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: The circadian variation in portal blood pressure and in the diurnal incidence of variceal bleeding is well known, but the seasonal variation in variceal bleeding is still controversial. This report analyzes the seasonal variations in mortality and hospitalizations due to variceal bleeding in the French population. METHODS: All the deaths due to variceal bleeding that occurred from 1987 to 1996 (N = 13,514) and all adults discharged from French public hospitals for variceal bleeding from 1995 to 1997 (N = 17,026) were examined retrospectively. Cumulated monthly averages were expressed as the percentage above or below the average monthly value during the entire study period. RESULTS: Deaths due to variceal bleeding in France occurred with a clear annual periodicity and peaked in winter (December/January), both in the overall population and in subgroups defined by age and sex, except for women. The distribution of cumulative monthly deaths differed by 24{\%}, with a peak (14{\%} above average) in December and a trough (10{\%} below average) in July (Roger's test: p < 0.001). Hospitalizations for variceal bleeding in French public hospitals followed a similar seasonal pattern (p < 0.001) with a winter-spring predominance (4{\%} to 7{\%} from December through April), except in patients aged 15-49 yr. There was a short sharp peak of mortality in early winter in French public hospitals. The seasonality of hospitalization and death increased markedly with age. CONCLUSIONS: A better understanding of these age- and sex-specific seasonal patterns would allow to improve pharmacological protection measures, disease management, and educational strategies.",
author = "Hsu, {Ronald K.} and Andy Yu and Lee, {John G.} and Joseph Leung",
year = "2001",
doi = "10.1016/S0002-9270(01)02452-2",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "96",
pages = "1881--1887",
journal = "American Journal of Gastroenterology",
issn = "0002-9270",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Seasonal variations in variceal bleeding mortality and hospitalization in France

AU - Hsu, Ronald K.

AU - Yu, Andy

AU - Lee, John G.

AU - Leung, Joseph

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - OBJECTIVES: The circadian variation in portal blood pressure and in the diurnal incidence of variceal bleeding is well known, but the seasonal variation in variceal bleeding is still controversial. This report analyzes the seasonal variations in mortality and hospitalizations due to variceal bleeding in the French population. METHODS: All the deaths due to variceal bleeding that occurred from 1987 to 1996 (N = 13,514) and all adults discharged from French public hospitals for variceal bleeding from 1995 to 1997 (N = 17,026) were examined retrospectively. Cumulated monthly averages were expressed as the percentage above or below the average monthly value during the entire study period. RESULTS: Deaths due to variceal bleeding in France occurred with a clear annual periodicity and peaked in winter (December/January), both in the overall population and in subgroups defined by age and sex, except for women. The distribution of cumulative monthly deaths differed by 24%, with a peak (14% above average) in December and a trough (10% below average) in July (Roger's test: p < 0.001). Hospitalizations for variceal bleeding in French public hospitals followed a similar seasonal pattern (p < 0.001) with a winter-spring predominance (4% to 7% from December through April), except in patients aged 15-49 yr. There was a short sharp peak of mortality in early winter in French public hospitals. The seasonality of hospitalization and death increased markedly with age. CONCLUSIONS: A better understanding of these age- and sex-specific seasonal patterns would allow to improve pharmacological protection measures, disease management, and educational strategies.

AB - OBJECTIVES: The circadian variation in portal blood pressure and in the diurnal incidence of variceal bleeding is well known, but the seasonal variation in variceal bleeding is still controversial. This report analyzes the seasonal variations in mortality and hospitalizations due to variceal bleeding in the French population. METHODS: All the deaths due to variceal bleeding that occurred from 1987 to 1996 (N = 13,514) and all adults discharged from French public hospitals for variceal bleeding from 1995 to 1997 (N = 17,026) were examined retrospectively. Cumulated monthly averages were expressed as the percentage above or below the average monthly value during the entire study period. RESULTS: Deaths due to variceal bleeding in France occurred with a clear annual periodicity and peaked in winter (December/January), both in the overall population and in subgroups defined by age and sex, except for women. The distribution of cumulative monthly deaths differed by 24%, with a peak (14% above average) in December and a trough (10% below average) in July (Roger's test: p < 0.001). Hospitalizations for variceal bleeding in French public hospitals followed a similar seasonal pattern (p < 0.001) with a winter-spring predominance (4% to 7% from December through April), except in patients aged 15-49 yr. There was a short sharp peak of mortality in early winter in French public hospitals. The seasonality of hospitalization and death increased markedly with age. CONCLUSIONS: A better understanding of these age- and sex-specific seasonal patterns would allow to improve pharmacological protection measures, disease management, and educational strategies.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034971199&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0034971199&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0002-9270(01)02452-2

DO - 10.1016/S0002-9270(01)02452-2

M3 - Article

VL - 96

SP - 1881

EP - 1887

JO - American Journal of Gastroenterology

JF - American Journal of Gastroenterology

SN - 0002-9270

IS - 6

ER -