Seasonal Variation in the Vector Competence of Culex tarsalis (Diptera: Culicidae) from the Coachella Valley of California for Western Equine Encephalomyelitis and St. Louis Encephalitis Viruses

William Reisen, J. L. Hardy, S. B. Presser, R. E. Chiles

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The vector competence of Culex tarsalis Coquillett from the Coachella Valley of California for western equine encephalomyelitis (WEE) and St. Louis encephalitis (SLE) viruses was monitored monthly from February to November 1993. The concentration of WEE virus required to infect 50% of the females increased during summer coincidentally with ambient temperature and was highest during July. Transmission rates of WEE virus were high during March, low during May-June, and high again during July-September. Females expressed both mesenteronal escape and salivary gland barriers limiting WEE virus dissemination and transmission rates, respectively. SLE virus infection and dissemination rates did not vary among months, but transmission rates were highest during July-September. Although infection rates with SLE virus were moderate, most infected females developed disseminated infections. Salivary gland infection or escape barriers prevented SLE virus transmission in 16-100% of infected females.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)433-437
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Medical Entomology
Volume33
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

Fingerprint

Western Equine Encephalomyelitis
Western equine encephalomyelitis
St. Louis Encephalitis Viruses
Saint Louis encephalitis virus
Culex tarsalis
vector competence
Culex
Western Equine Encephalitis Viruses
Western equine encephalitis virus
Culicidae
Diptera
Mental Competency
valleys
seasonal variation
salivary glands
Salivary Glands
infection
Infection
virus transmission
Virus Diseases

Keywords

  • California
  • Culex tarsalis
  • St. Louis encephalitis virus
  • Vector competence
  • Western equine encephalomyelitis virus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • veterinary(all)
  • Insect Science
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

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title = "Seasonal Variation in the Vector Competence of Culex tarsalis (Diptera: Culicidae) from the Coachella Valley of California for Western Equine Encephalomyelitis and St. Louis Encephalitis Viruses",
abstract = "The vector competence of Culex tarsalis Coquillett from the Coachella Valley of California for western equine encephalomyelitis (WEE) and St. Louis encephalitis (SLE) viruses was monitored monthly from February to November 1993. The concentration of WEE virus required to infect 50{\%} of the females increased during summer coincidentally with ambient temperature and was highest during July. Transmission rates of WEE virus were high during March, low during May-June, and high again during July-September. Females expressed both mesenteronal escape and salivary gland barriers limiting WEE virus dissemination and transmission rates, respectively. SLE virus infection and dissemination rates did not vary among months, but transmission rates were highest during July-September. Although infection rates with SLE virus were moderate, most infected females developed disseminated infections. Salivary gland infection or escape barriers prevented SLE virus transmission in 16-100{\%} of infected females.",
keywords = "California, Culex tarsalis, St. Louis encephalitis virus, Vector competence, Western equine encephalomyelitis virus",
author = "William Reisen and Hardy, {J. L.} and Presser, {S. B.} and Chiles, {R. E.}",
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T2 - Culicidae) from the Coachella Valley of California for Western Equine Encephalomyelitis and St. Louis Encephalitis Viruses

AU - Reisen, William

AU - Hardy, J. L.

AU - Presser, S. B.

AU - Chiles, R. E.

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N2 - The vector competence of Culex tarsalis Coquillett from the Coachella Valley of California for western equine encephalomyelitis (WEE) and St. Louis encephalitis (SLE) viruses was monitored monthly from February to November 1993. The concentration of WEE virus required to infect 50% of the females increased during summer coincidentally with ambient temperature and was highest during July. Transmission rates of WEE virus were high during March, low during May-June, and high again during July-September. Females expressed both mesenteronal escape and salivary gland barriers limiting WEE virus dissemination and transmission rates, respectively. SLE virus infection and dissemination rates did not vary among months, but transmission rates were highest during July-September. Although infection rates with SLE virus were moderate, most infected females developed disseminated infections. Salivary gland infection or escape barriers prevented SLE virus transmission in 16-100% of infected females.

AB - The vector competence of Culex tarsalis Coquillett from the Coachella Valley of California for western equine encephalomyelitis (WEE) and St. Louis encephalitis (SLE) viruses was monitored monthly from February to November 1993. The concentration of WEE virus required to infect 50% of the females increased during summer coincidentally with ambient temperature and was highest during July. Transmission rates of WEE virus were high during March, low during May-June, and high again during July-September. Females expressed both mesenteronal escape and salivary gland barriers limiting WEE virus dissemination and transmission rates, respectively. SLE virus infection and dissemination rates did not vary among months, but transmission rates were highest during July-September. Although infection rates with SLE virus were moderate, most infected females developed disseminated infections. Salivary gland infection or escape barriers prevented SLE virus transmission in 16-100% of infected females.

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