Sea Lions Develop Human-like Vernix Caseosa Delivering Branched Fats and Squalene to the GI Tract

Dong Hao Wang, Rinat Ran-Ressler, Judy St Leger, Erika Nilson, Lauren Palmer, Richard Collins, J. Thomas Brenna

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Vernix caseosa, the white waxy coating found on newborn human skin, is thought to be a uniquely human substance. Its signature characteristic is exceptional richness in saturated branched chain fatty acids (BCFA) and squalene. Vernix particles sloughed from the skin suspended in amniotic fluid are swallowed by the human fetus, depositing BCFA/squalene throughout the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, thereby establishing a unique microbial niche that influences development of nascent microbiota. Here we show that late-term California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) fetuses have true vernix caseosa, delivering BCFA and squalene to the fetal GI tract thereby recapitulating the human fetal gut microbial niche. These are the first data demonstrating the production of true vernix caseosa in a species other than Homo sapiens. Its presence in a marine mammal supports the hypothesis of an aquatic habituation period in the evolution of modern humans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number7478
JournalScientific Reports
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

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    Wang, D. H., Ran-Ressler, R., St Leger, J., Nilson, E., Palmer, L., Collins, R., & Brenna, J. T. (2018). Sea Lions Develop Human-like Vernix Caseosa Delivering Branched Fats and Squalene to the GI Tract. Scientific Reports, 8(1), [7478]. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-25871-1