Scintigraphic evaluation of intra-arterial and intravenous regional limb perfusion of allogeneic bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in the normal equine distal limb using 99mTc-HMPAO

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Reasons for performing study: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are commonly injected intralesionally for treatment of soft tissue injuries in the horse. Alternative routes of administration would be beneficial for treatment of lesions that cannot be accessed directly or to limit needle-induced iatrogenic damage to the surrounding tissue. Objectives: The purpose of our study was to evaluate MSC distribution after intra-arterial (IA) and intravenous (IV) regional limb perfusions (RLP) using scintigraphy. We hypothesised that MSCs would persist in the distal limb after tourniquet removal and that both techniques would lead to diffuse MSC distribution. Methods: Six horses were used in the study. MSCs were labelled with hexamethyl propylene amine oxime (HMPAO) and technetium-99m. RLP was performed through the median artery of one forelimb and the cephalic vein of the opposite limb under general anaesthesia. The tourniquet was left in place for 45min. Scintigraphic images were obtained at 0, 45, 75min, 6h and 24h post injection. Results: Distribution of labelled MSCs through the entire distal limb was achieved with all 6 IA RLP, but 3 out of 6IV RLP showed poor or absent uptake distal to the metacarpus. Mesenchymal stem cell persistence was 39% (30-60%) and 28% (14-50%) (median [minimum-maximum]) at 6h for IA and IV RLP, respectively. Severe arterial thrombosis occurred in one horse after IA RLP. Conclusions: Both IA and IV RLP of the distal limb result in MSC persistence in perfused tissues. The IA perfusion resulted in more reliable cell distribution to the pastern and foot area. Potential relevance: Regional limb perfusion of MSCs might be used in cases where intralesional injection is not possible or in order to avoid iatrogenic needle damage. Further work is needed to assess the safety of IA RLP before its clinical use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)594-599
Number of pages6
JournalEquine Veterinary Journal
Volume44
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2012

Fingerprint

propylene
oximes
Oximes
limbs (animal)
Mesenchymal Stromal Cells
amines
bone marrow
Horses
Amines
stem cells
Extremities
Perfusion
Bone Marrow
horses
tourniquets
Tourniquets
Needles
Metacarpus
Intralesional Injections
technetium

Keywords

  • Hexamethyl propylene amine oxime
  • HMPAO
  • Horse
  • Mesenchymal stem cells
  • Regional limb perfusion
  • Scintigraphy
  • Technetium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Equine

Cite this

@article{9a9c55bbaf2947089fd50c8ce64a8152,
title = "Scintigraphic evaluation of intra-arterial and intravenous regional limb perfusion of allogeneic bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in the normal equine distal limb using 99mTc-HMPAO",
abstract = "Reasons for performing study: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are commonly injected intralesionally for treatment of soft tissue injuries in the horse. Alternative routes of administration would be beneficial for treatment of lesions that cannot be accessed directly or to limit needle-induced iatrogenic damage to the surrounding tissue. Objectives: The purpose of our study was to evaluate MSC distribution after intra-arterial (IA) and intravenous (IV) regional limb perfusions (RLP) using scintigraphy. We hypothesised that MSCs would persist in the distal limb after tourniquet removal and that both techniques would lead to diffuse MSC distribution. Methods: Six horses were used in the study. MSCs were labelled with hexamethyl propylene amine oxime (HMPAO) and technetium-99m. RLP was performed through the median artery of one forelimb and the cephalic vein of the opposite limb under general anaesthesia. The tourniquet was left in place for 45min. Scintigraphic images were obtained at 0, 45, 75min, 6h and 24h post injection. Results: Distribution of labelled MSCs through the entire distal limb was achieved with all 6 IA RLP, but 3 out of 6IV RLP showed poor or absent uptake distal to the metacarpus. Mesenchymal stem cell persistence was 39{\%} (30-60{\%}) and 28{\%} (14-50{\%}) (median [minimum-maximum]) at 6h for IA and IV RLP, respectively. Severe arterial thrombosis occurred in one horse after IA RLP. Conclusions: Both IA and IV RLP of the distal limb result in MSC persistence in perfused tissues. The IA perfusion resulted in more reliable cell distribution to the pastern and foot area. Potential relevance: Regional limb perfusion of MSCs might be used in cases where intralesional injection is not possible or in order to avoid iatrogenic needle damage. Further work is needed to assess the safety of IA RLP before its clinical use.",
keywords = "Hexamethyl propylene amine oxime, HMPAO, Horse, Mesenchymal stem cells, Regional limb perfusion, Scintigraphy, Technetium",
author = "A. Sole and Mathieu Spriet and Galuppo, {Larry D} and Padgett, {K. A.} and Borjesson, {Dori L} and Wisner, {Erik R} and Brosnan, {Robert J} and Vidal, {M. A.}",
year = "2012",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1111/j.2042-3306.2011.00530.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "44",
pages = "594--599",
journal = "Equine veterinary journal. Supplement",
issn = "2042-3306",
publisher = "British Equine Veterinary Association",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Scintigraphic evaluation of intra-arterial and intravenous regional limb perfusion of allogeneic bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in the normal equine distal limb using 99mTc-HMPAO

AU - Sole, A.

AU - Spriet, Mathieu

AU - Galuppo, Larry D

AU - Padgett, K. A.

AU - Borjesson, Dori L

AU - Wisner, Erik R

AU - Brosnan, Robert J

AU - Vidal, M. A.

PY - 2012/9

Y1 - 2012/9

N2 - Reasons for performing study: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are commonly injected intralesionally for treatment of soft tissue injuries in the horse. Alternative routes of administration would be beneficial for treatment of lesions that cannot be accessed directly or to limit needle-induced iatrogenic damage to the surrounding tissue. Objectives: The purpose of our study was to evaluate MSC distribution after intra-arterial (IA) and intravenous (IV) regional limb perfusions (RLP) using scintigraphy. We hypothesised that MSCs would persist in the distal limb after tourniquet removal and that both techniques would lead to diffuse MSC distribution. Methods: Six horses were used in the study. MSCs were labelled with hexamethyl propylene amine oxime (HMPAO) and technetium-99m. RLP was performed through the median artery of one forelimb and the cephalic vein of the opposite limb under general anaesthesia. The tourniquet was left in place for 45min. Scintigraphic images were obtained at 0, 45, 75min, 6h and 24h post injection. Results: Distribution of labelled MSCs through the entire distal limb was achieved with all 6 IA RLP, but 3 out of 6IV RLP showed poor or absent uptake distal to the metacarpus. Mesenchymal stem cell persistence was 39% (30-60%) and 28% (14-50%) (median [minimum-maximum]) at 6h for IA and IV RLP, respectively. Severe arterial thrombosis occurred in one horse after IA RLP. Conclusions: Both IA and IV RLP of the distal limb result in MSC persistence in perfused tissues. The IA perfusion resulted in more reliable cell distribution to the pastern and foot area. Potential relevance: Regional limb perfusion of MSCs might be used in cases where intralesional injection is not possible or in order to avoid iatrogenic needle damage. Further work is needed to assess the safety of IA RLP before its clinical use.

AB - Reasons for performing study: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are commonly injected intralesionally for treatment of soft tissue injuries in the horse. Alternative routes of administration would be beneficial for treatment of lesions that cannot be accessed directly or to limit needle-induced iatrogenic damage to the surrounding tissue. Objectives: The purpose of our study was to evaluate MSC distribution after intra-arterial (IA) and intravenous (IV) regional limb perfusions (RLP) using scintigraphy. We hypothesised that MSCs would persist in the distal limb after tourniquet removal and that both techniques would lead to diffuse MSC distribution. Methods: Six horses were used in the study. MSCs were labelled with hexamethyl propylene amine oxime (HMPAO) and technetium-99m. RLP was performed through the median artery of one forelimb and the cephalic vein of the opposite limb under general anaesthesia. The tourniquet was left in place for 45min. Scintigraphic images were obtained at 0, 45, 75min, 6h and 24h post injection. Results: Distribution of labelled MSCs through the entire distal limb was achieved with all 6 IA RLP, but 3 out of 6IV RLP showed poor or absent uptake distal to the metacarpus. Mesenchymal stem cell persistence was 39% (30-60%) and 28% (14-50%) (median [minimum-maximum]) at 6h for IA and IV RLP, respectively. Severe arterial thrombosis occurred in one horse after IA RLP. Conclusions: Both IA and IV RLP of the distal limb result in MSC persistence in perfused tissues. The IA perfusion resulted in more reliable cell distribution to the pastern and foot area. Potential relevance: Regional limb perfusion of MSCs might be used in cases where intralesional injection is not possible or in order to avoid iatrogenic needle damage. Further work is needed to assess the safety of IA RLP before its clinical use.

KW - Hexamethyl propylene amine oxime

KW - HMPAO

KW - Horse

KW - Mesenchymal stem cells

KW - Regional limb perfusion

KW - Scintigraphy

KW - Technetium

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84865195356&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84865195356&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.2042-3306.2011.00530.x

DO - 10.1111/j.2042-3306.2011.00530.x

M3 - Article

C2 - 22212017

AN - SCOPUS:84865195356

VL - 44

SP - 594

EP - 599

JO - Equine veterinary journal. Supplement

JF - Equine veterinary journal. Supplement

SN - 2042-3306

IS - 5

ER -