Sand DNA - A genetic library of life at the water's edge

Robert K. Naviaux, Benjamin Good, John Douglas Mcpherson, David L. Steffen, David Markusic, Barbara Ransom, Jacques Corbeil

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Powdered silica has long been used for the purification of nucleic acids in the laboratory. Silicate-rich, ordinary ocean beach sand was found to concentrate dissolved DNA from seawater over 10 000-fold, providing a rich, renewable, and easily accessible genetic library that is easy to harvest and inexpensive to process. We found an average of 29 μg ml-1 of cell-free DNA adsorbed to silicate-rich, wave-washed sand from 14 beaches bordering 9 seas around the world. The DNA from a reference beach was shotgun cloned, 3 107 399 nucleotides of anonymous, non-redundant sequence were analyzed, and 2571 genes were found; 2562 of these genes were new. The apparent complexity of sand DNA was greater than 1.4 × 1011 nucleotides. About 90 % of the sequences identified were from prokaryotes, 10 % from eukaryotes, and 1 % were viral. Sequences from all kingdoms of life were present. Over half the sequences came from new phylotypes, reflecting the novelty of this genetic reservoir.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9-22
Number of pages14
JournalMarine Ecology Progress Series
Volume301
StatePublished - Oct 11 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

A-DNA
sand
beaches
DNA
beach
silicates
silicate
nucleotides
sand wave
water
gene
prokaryote
nucleic acid
eukaryote
prokaryotic cells
silica
nucleic acids
purification
eukaryotic cells
genes

Keywords

  • Beach
  • Dissolved DNA
  • Genetic library
  • Sand

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology
  • Aquatic Science

Cite this

Naviaux, R. K., Good, B., Mcpherson, J. D., Steffen, D. L., Markusic, D., Ransom, B., & Corbeil, J. (2005). Sand DNA - A genetic library of life at the water's edge. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 301, 9-22.

Sand DNA - A genetic library of life at the water's edge. / Naviaux, Robert K.; Good, Benjamin; Mcpherson, John Douglas; Steffen, David L.; Markusic, David; Ransom, Barbara; Corbeil, Jacques.

In: Marine Ecology Progress Series, Vol. 301, 11.10.2005, p. 9-22.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Naviaux, RK, Good, B, Mcpherson, JD, Steffen, DL, Markusic, D, Ransom, B & Corbeil, J 2005, 'Sand DNA - A genetic library of life at the water's edge', Marine Ecology Progress Series, vol. 301, pp. 9-22.
Naviaux RK, Good B, Mcpherson JD, Steffen DL, Markusic D, Ransom B et al. Sand DNA - A genetic library of life at the water's edge. Marine Ecology Progress Series. 2005 Oct 11;301:9-22.
Naviaux, Robert K. ; Good, Benjamin ; Mcpherson, John Douglas ; Steffen, David L. ; Markusic, David ; Ransom, Barbara ; Corbeil, Jacques. / Sand DNA - A genetic library of life at the water's edge. In: Marine Ecology Progress Series. 2005 ; Vol. 301. pp. 9-22.
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