Safety of contraceptive method use among women with systemic lupus erythematosus: A systematic review

Kelly R. Culwell, Kathryn M. Curtis, Maria Del Carmen Cravioto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the evidence on the safety of contraceptive method use among women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). DATA SOURCES: We searched the PubMed, MEDLINE, and LILACS databases for peer-reviewed articles published from database inception through January 2009, concerning the safety of contraceptive use among women with SLE. METHODS OF STUDY SELECTION: We included studies that examined health outcomes among women using a contraceptive method after the diagnosis of SLE. The quality of each individual piece of evidence was assessed using the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force grading system. TABULATION, INTEGRATION, AND RESULTS: Our search yielded 275 articles. A total of 14 articles that reported on 13 studies met our inclusion criteria. Available evidence, including two good-quality randomized controlled trials, indicates that use of combined oral contraceptives does not lead to increased flares of disease or worsening disease activity in women with inactive or stable active SLE. No increase in disease activity with use of progestogen-only contraceptives was noted in four studies. Limited evidence indicates a possible increased risk of thrombosis in women with positive antiphospholipid antibodies and history of oral contraceptive use. Limited evidence indicates that the use of the copper intrauterine device is not associated with worsening disease activity or infection in women with SLE. CONCLUSION: Available evidence indicates that many women with SLE can be considered good candidates for most contraceptive methods, including hormonal contraceptives. The benefits of contraception for many women with SLE likely outweigh the risks of unintended pregnancy in this population. Women with positive antiphospholipid antibodies are not good candidates for combined hormonal contraception given their elevated baseline risk of thrombosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)341-353
Number of pages13
JournalObstetrics and Gynecology
Volume114
Issue number2 PART 1
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Contraception
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Safety
Contraceptive Agents
Antiphospholipid Antibodies
Thrombosis
Copper Intrauterine Devices
Databases
Contraceptives, Oral, Combined
Advisory Committees
Progestins
Oral Contraceptives
PubMed
MEDLINE
Randomized Controlled Trials
Pregnancy
Health
Infection
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Safety of contraceptive method use among women with systemic lupus erythematosus : A systematic review. / Culwell, Kelly R.; Curtis, Kathryn M.; Del Carmen Cravioto, Maria.

In: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 114, No. 2 PART 1, 08.2009, p. 341-353.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Culwell, Kelly R. ; Curtis, Kathryn M. ; Del Carmen Cravioto, Maria. / Safety of contraceptive method use among women with systemic lupus erythematosus : A systematic review. In: Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2009 ; Vol. 114, No. 2 PART 1. pp. 341-353.
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