Rural Maternity Care: New Models of Access

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite huge health care expenditures, many rural areas of the United States are without adequate access to basic maternity services. Hospital closures and changes in reimbursement have created new threats, even in areas with functional systems of delivering maternity care. New models of care must be developed that take advantage of attributes of low-volume rural maternity units, increase the number of collaborative practices among various providers of maternity services, and judiciously apply new technologies to bring perinatal expertise into the rural hospital when appropriate. Local access to maternity care in rural communities is essential to improve birth outcomes and lower costs. Standardization of management of obstetric emergencies and advances in telecommunication technology may make these low-technology, isolated communities safer than they have been in the past. Changes in health care financing, particularly managed care with capitation, may further support these changes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)161-165
Number of pages5
JournalBirth
Volume23
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1996

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Technology
Health Facility Closure
Healthcare Financing
Delivery of Health Care
Telecommunications
Rural Hospitals
Managed Care Programs
Rural Population
Health Expenditures
Obstetrics
Emergencies
Parturition
Costs and Cost Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Rural Maternity Care : New Models of Access. / Nesbitt, Thomas S.

In: Birth, Vol. 23, No. 3, 1996, p. 161-165.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nesbitt, TS 1996, 'Rural Maternity Care: New Models of Access', Birth, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 161-165.
Nesbitt, Thomas S. / Rural Maternity Care : New Models of Access. In: Birth. 1996 ; Vol. 23, No. 3. pp. 161-165.
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